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New microsatellite markers for examining genetic variation in peripheral and core populations of the Coastal Giant Salamander (Dicamptodon tenebrosus)

Dudaniec, Rachael LU ; Storfer, Andrew; Spear, Stephen F. and Richardson, John S. (2010) In PLoS ONE 5. p.14333-14333
Abstract
The Coastal Giant Salamander (Dicamptodon tenebrosus) is classified as threatened at the northern periphery of its range in British Columbia (BC), Canada, primarily due to forestry practices and habitat fragmentation. Characterising dispersal behaviour and population connectivity is therefore a priority for this region, while genetic differentiation in core versus peripheral locations remains unstudied in this wide-ranging species. We present seven new polymorphic microsatellite markers for use in population genetic analyses of D. tenebrosus. We examine locus characteristics and genetic variation in 12 streams at the species' northern range limit in BC, and within two regions representing sub-peripheral (North Cascades) and core localities... (More)
The Coastal Giant Salamander (Dicamptodon tenebrosus) is classified as threatened at the northern periphery of its range in British Columbia (BC), Canada, primarily due to forestry practices and habitat fragmentation. Characterising dispersal behaviour and population connectivity is therefore a priority for this region, while genetic differentiation in core versus peripheral locations remains unstudied in this wide-ranging species. We present seven new polymorphic microsatellite markers for use in population genetic analyses of D. tenebrosus. We examine locus characteristics and genetic variation in 12 streams at the species' northern range limit in BC, and within two regions representing sub-peripheral (North Cascades) and core localities (South Cascades) in Washington State, United States. In BC, the number of alleles per locus ranged from 2–5 and observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.044–0.825. Genetic differentiation was highest between BC and the South Cascades, and intermediate between BC and the North Cascades. Across loci, mean allelic richness was similar across regions, while private allelic richness was highest in the core locality (corrected for sample size). These new microsatellite loci will be a valuable addition to existing markers for detailed landscape and population genetic analyses of D. tenebrosus across its range. (Less)
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published
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PLoS ONE
volume
5
pages
14333 - 14333
publisher
Public Library of Science
external identifiers
  • scopus:78650723380
ISSN
1932-6203
DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0014333
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
f62c73e3-9421-47a7-8861-ad4647690ae0 (old id 3738469)
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0014333
date added to LUP
2013-05-23 14:04:41
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2018-05-29 10:45:08
@article{f62c73e3-9421-47a7-8861-ad4647690ae0,
  abstract     = {The Coastal Giant Salamander (Dicamptodon tenebrosus) is classified as threatened at the northern periphery of its range in British Columbia (BC), Canada, primarily due to forestry practices and habitat fragmentation. Characterising dispersal behaviour and population connectivity is therefore a priority for this region, while genetic differentiation in core versus peripheral locations remains unstudied in this wide-ranging species. We present seven new polymorphic microsatellite markers for use in population genetic analyses of D. tenebrosus. We examine locus characteristics and genetic variation in 12 streams at the species' northern range limit in BC, and within two regions representing sub-peripheral (North Cascades) and core localities (South Cascades) in Washington State, United States. In BC, the number of alleles per locus ranged from 2–5 and observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.044–0.825. Genetic differentiation was highest between BC and the South Cascades, and intermediate between BC and the North Cascades. Across loci, mean allelic richness was similar across regions, while private allelic richness was highest in the core locality (corrected for sample size). These new microsatellite loci will be a valuable addition to existing markers for detailed landscape and population genetic analyses of D. tenebrosus across its range.},
  author       = {Dudaniec, Rachael and Storfer, Andrew and Spear, Stephen F. and Richardson, John S.},
  issn         = {1932-6203},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {14333--14333},
  publisher    = {Public Library of Science},
  series       = {PLoS ONE},
  title        = {New microsatellite markers for examining genetic variation in peripheral and core populations of the Coastal Giant Salamander (Dicamptodon tenebrosus)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0014333},
  volume       = {5},
  year         = {2010},
}