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Continuity of leisure participation from middle age to old age

Agahi, Neda ; Ahacic, Kozma and Parker, Marti G LU (2006) In Journals of Gerontology - Series B Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences 61(6). p.340-346
Abstract
Objectives. Continuity in habits, activities, and roles is important upon entering old age according to the continuity theory of aging. Few studies have investigated patterns of leisure participation over an extended period of time among older adults. This study examines changes in nine different leisure activities in a nationally representative sample of individuals followed over a 34-year period in Sweden. Methods. We used longitudinal data from three waves of an interview survey that followed 495 individuals from 1968 to 2002. Individuals were aged 43-65 in 1968 and 77-99 in 2002. We conducted logistic regression analyses on each of the leisure activities. Results. For the panel followed, a decline in participation rates was the most... (More)
Objectives. Continuity in habits, activities, and roles is important upon entering old age according to the continuity theory of aging. Few studies have investigated patterns of leisure participation over an extended period of time among older adults. This study examines changes in nine different leisure activities in a nationally representative sample of individuals followed over a 34-year period in Sweden. Methods. We used longitudinal data from three waves of an interview survey that followed 495 individuals from 1968 to 2002. Individuals were aged 43-65 in 1968 and 77-99 in 2002. We conducted logistic regression analyses on each of the leisure activities. Results. For the panel followed, a decline in participation rates was the most common pattern over time. Analyses at the individual level showed that late-life participation was generally preceded by participation earlier in life. Previous participation, both 10 and 34 years earlier, predicted late-life participation. The modifying effect of functional status in late life was small. Discussion. In accordance with the continuity theory of aging. leisure participation in old age is often a continuation of previous participation. However, there is considerable variation among both activities and individuals. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
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in
Journals of Gerontology - Series B Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences
volume
61
issue
6
pages
340 - 346
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000242222900015
  • scopus:33751564535
ISSN
1079-5014
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: The VĂ¥rdal Institute (016540000)
id
ff6dbbe7-b7ab-40ca-9e44-5fbf3d5a3e74 (old id 376530)
alternative location
http://psychsoc.gerontologyjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/61/6/S340
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 16:28:52
date last changed
2021-09-22 02:28:48
@article{ff6dbbe7-b7ab-40ca-9e44-5fbf3d5a3e74,
  abstract     = {Objectives. Continuity in habits, activities, and roles is important upon entering old age according to the continuity theory of aging. Few studies have investigated patterns of leisure participation over an extended period of time among older adults. This study examines changes in nine different leisure activities in a nationally representative sample of individuals followed over a 34-year period in Sweden. Methods. We used longitudinal data from three waves of an interview survey that followed 495 individuals from 1968 to 2002. Individuals were aged 43-65 in 1968 and 77-99 in 2002. We conducted logistic regression analyses on each of the leisure activities. Results. For the panel followed, a decline in participation rates was the most common pattern over time. Analyses at the individual level showed that late-life participation was generally preceded by participation earlier in life. Previous participation, both 10 and 34 years earlier, predicted late-life participation. The modifying effect of functional status in late life was small. Discussion. In accordance with the continuity theory of aging. leisure participation in old age is often a continuation of previous participation. However, there is considerable variation among both activities and individuals.},
  author       = {Agahi, Neda and Ahacic, Kozma and Parker, Marti G},
  issn         = {1079-5014},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {340--346},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Journals of Gerontology - Series B Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences},
  title        = {Continuity of leisure participation from middle age to old age},
  url          = {http://psychsoc.gerontologyjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/61/6/S340},
  volume       = {61},
  year         = {2006},
}