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De-Centering Federal Origins: India and the Contested Appropriation of Federal Democracy

Svensson, Ted LU (2018) p.38-58
Abstract
The chapter explores conceptions during the early twentieth century regarding the required and desired underpinnings of a post-imperial India – one in which both British India and the indirectly ruled princely states were first, by the British, proposed and then, through the work of the Indian Constituent Assembly, made to constitute a federation. It specifically enquires into India’s federal origins – that is, what enabled the push towards federalism and what was it foremost an answer to – and the extent to which the findings confirm Europe-centered accounts and expectations. In the chapter, India is found to equal an exemplary case when we address the manner in which notions of proper and full-fledged statehood developed as part of... (More)
The chapter explores conceptions during the early twentieth century regarding the required and desired underpinnings of a post-imperial India – one in which both British India and the indirectly ruled princely states were first, by the British, proposed and then, through the work of the Indian Constituent Assembly, made to constitute a federation. It specifically enquires into India’s federal origins – that is, what enabled the push towards federalism and what was it foremost an answer to – and the extent to which the findings confirm Europe-centered accounts and expectations. In the chapter, India is found to equal an exemplary case when we address the manner in which notions of proper and full-fledged statehood developed as part of imperial and decolonizing undertakings. India’s federal origins, moreover, attest to the restricted validity of regarding state making in Europe as unaffected by imperial commitments and the rest of the world as equivalent to a ‘diffused Europe.’ (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
India, princely states, indirect rule, federalism, federal origins, decolonisation
host publication
De-Centering State Making
editor
Bartelson, Jens; Hall, Martin; Teorell, Jan; ; and
pages
21 pages
publisher
Edward Elgar Publishing
ISBN
9781788112987
DOI
10.4337/9781788112994
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
37f05e4d-9093-4df7-9981-76b8c6f4a3bc
date added to LUP
2018-06-04 13:02:02
date last changed
2018-11-21 21:40:10
@inbook{37f05e4d-9093-4df7-9981-76b8c6f4a3bc,
  abstract     = {The chapter explores conceptions during the early twentieth century regarding the required and desired underpinnings of a post-imperial India – one in which both British India and the indirectly ruled princely states were first, by the British, proposed and then, through the work of the Indian Constituent Assembly, made to constitute a federation. It specifically enquires into India’s federal origins – that is, what enabled the push towards federalism and what was it foremost an answer to – and the extent to which the findings confirm Europe-centered accounts and expectations. In the chapter, India is found to equal an exemplary case when we address the manner in which notions of proper and full-fledged statehood developed as part of imperial and decolonizing undertakings. India’s federal origins, moreover, attest to the restricted validity of regarding state making in Europe as unaffected by imperial commitments and the rest of the world as equivalent to a ‘diffused Europe.’},
  author       = {Svensson, Ted},
  editor       = {Bartelson, Jens and Hall, Martin and Teorell, Jan},
  isbn         = {9781788112987},
  keyword      = {India,princely states,indirect rule,federalism,federal origins,decolonisation},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {38--58},
  publisher    = {Edward Elgar Publishing},
  title        = {De-Centering Federal Origins: India and the Contested Appropriation of Federal Democracy},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4337/9781788112994},
  year         = {2018},
}