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Consensus Recommendations on Pathologic Changes in the Hippocampus: A Postmortem Multicenter Inter-Rater Study.

Rauramaa, Tuomas ; Pikkarainen, Maria ; Englund, Elisabet LU ; Ince, Paul G ; Jellinger, Kurt ; Paetau, Anders and Alafuzoff, Irina (2013) In Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology 72(6). p.452-461
Abstract
There is no consensus on the pathologic conditions or severity implied by the term "hippocampal sclerosis" (HS). In this study, a panel of experienced neuropathologists evaluated inter-rater agreement for pathologic diagnoses in the hippocampus and proposes consensus recommendations on the use of the term "HS." In a group of 251 cases of HS selected from a large autopsy cohort (1,388; 18%), a coordinating group identified 5 patterns of degenerative or vascular pathology. Four independent neuropathologists assessed a single set of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections following descriptive definitions to classify the appearances and assign the diagnosis of HS, if appropriate. Diagnostic agreement (range, 36%-70%) was highest for vascular... (More)
There is no consensus on the pathologic conditions or severity implied by the term "hippocampal sclerosis" (HS). In this study, a panel of experienced neuropathologists evaluated inter-rater agreement for pathologic diagnoses in the hippocampus and proposes consensus recommendations on the use of the term "HS." In a group of 251 cases of HS selected from a large autopsy cohort (1,388; 18%), a coordinating group identified 5 patterns of degenerative or vascular pathology. Four independent neuropathologists assessed a single set of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections following descriptive definitions to classify the appearances and assign the diagnosis of HS, if appropriate. Diagnostic agreement (range, 36%-70%) was highest for vascular lesions. Subsequent joint review of all cases highlighted the need to identify neurodegenerative lesions using immunohistochemistry. Initial agreement in assigning the diagnosis of HS varied from 0% to 86%. After a joint review, the group recommended that the term "HS" should be applied to all cases with complete/near-complete neuronal loss and gliosis in the subfields of the cornu Ammonis but not to hippocampal microinfarction. Therefore, the etiology of HS must be defined in association with a neurodegenerative process or as "lacking neurodegenerative markers," a pathologic condition presumed to arise from hypoxic/ischemic mechanisms. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
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published
subject
in
Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology
volume
72
issue
6
pages
452 - 461
publisher
American Association of Neuropathologists
external identifiers
  • wos:000319454400001
  • pmid:23656988
  • scopus:84878628255
  • pmid:23656988
ISSN
1554-6578
DOI
10.1097/NEN.0b013e318292492a
language
English
LU publication?
yes
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The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Pathology, (Lund) (013030000)
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f5097c77-fb96-4e35-bb78-cfc6190b6622 (old id 3804750)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23656988?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 10:57:33
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2019-11-05 01:35:04
@article{f5097c77-fb96-4e35-bb78-cfc6190b6622,
  abstract     = {There is no consensus on the pathologic conditions or severity implied by the term "hippocampal sclerosis" (HS). In this study, a panel of experienced neuropathologists evaluated inter-rater agreement for pathologic diagnoses in the hippocampus and proposes consensus recommendations on the use of the term "HS." In a group of 251 cases of HS selected from a large autopsy cohort (1,388; 18%), a coordinating group identified 5 patterns of degenerative or vascular pathology. Four independent neuropathologists assessed a single set of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections following descriptive definitions to classify the appearances and assign the diagnosis of HS, if appropriate. Diagnostic agreement (range, 36%-70%) was highest for vascular lesions. Subsequent joint review of all cases highlighted the need to identify neurodegenerative lesions using immunohistochemistry. Initial agreement in assigning the diagnosis of HS varied from 0% to 86%. After a joint review, the group recommended that the term "HS" should be applied to all cases with complete/near-complete neuronal loss and gliosis in the subfields of the cornu Ammonis but not to hippocampal microinfarction. Therefore, the etiology of HS must be defined in association with a neurodegenerative process or as "lacking neurodegenerative markers," a pathologic condition presumed to arise from hypoxic/ischemic mechanisms.},
  author       = {Rauramaa, Tuomas and Pikkarainen, Maria and Englund, Elisabet and Ince, Paul G and Jellinger, Kurt and Paetau, Anders and Alafuzoff, Irina},
  issn         = {1554-6578},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {452--461},
  publisher    = {American Association of Neuropathologists},
  series       = {Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology},
  title        = {Consensus Recommendations on Pathologic Changes in the Hippocampus: A Postmortem Multicenter Inter-Rater Study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NEN.0b013e318292492a},
  doi          = {10.1097/NEN.0b013e318292492a},
  volume       = {72},
  year         = {2013},
}