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Association between low concentrations of antibodies to protein alpha and Rib and invasive neonatal group B streptococcal infection

Larsson, Charlotte U LU ; Lindroth, Magnus LU ; Nordin, P. ; Stålhammar-Carlemalm, Margaretha LU ; Lindahl, Gunnar LU and Krantz, I. (2006) In Archives of disease in childhood. Fetal and neonatal edition 91(6). p.403-408
Abstract
Background: Infection with group B streptococci (GBS) is a serious neonatal disease. The GBS cell surface proteins a and Rib elicit protective immunity in animal models and have been suggested as potential antigens in a vaccine against human GBS disease. Aims: To test the hypothesis that transplacentally transferred maternal antibodies to GBS proteins contribute to the protection of the neonate from GBS infection. Methods: Thirty neonates with invasive infection were included in a case-control study. IgG antibody concentrations were measured in sera from these neonates, their mothers, and from 60 non-infected controls, neonates as well as mothers. Results: A clear association was found between concentrations of antibody to proteins a and... (More)
Background: Infection with group B streptococci (GBS) is a serious neonatal disease. The GBS cell surface proteins a and Rib elicit protective immunity in animal models and have been suggested as potential antigens in a vaccine against human GBS disease. Aims: To test the hypothesis that transplacentally transferred maternal antibodies to GBS proteins contribute to the protection of the neonate from GBS infection. Methods: Thirty neonates with invasive infection were included in a case-control study. IgG antibody concentrations were measured in sera from these neonates, their mothers, and from 60 non-infected controls, neonates as well as mothers. Results: A clear association was found between concentrations of antibody to proteins a and Rib neonatal and maternal sera, indicating that transplacental transfer had occurred. Moreover, low concentrations of antibodies to cc and Rib in neonatal sera were associated with invasive GBS infection caused by strains expressing the Rib protein. The odds ratio was 0.0007 (95% confidence interval 0.000 to 0.54) for antibodies to alpha and 0.002 (95% confidence interval 0.000 to 0.57) for antibodies to Rib. Conclusion: These findings support the notion that antibodies to GBS surface proteins contribute to the protection against neonatal infection. (Less)
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author
; ; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Archives of disease in childhood. Fetal and neonatal edition
volume
91
issue
6
pages
403 - 408
publisher
BMJ Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • wos:000241577300004
  • scopus:33750799583
ISSN
1359-2998
DOI
10.1136/adc.2005.090472
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
419934e3-9d1b-4f2b-88b5-ea915f62f8a4 (old id 384233)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 15:33:04
date last changed
2021-07-13 05:12:51
@article{419934e3-9d1b-4f2b-88b5-ea915f62f8a4,
  abstract     = {Background: Infection with group B streptococci (GBS) is a serious neonatal disease. The GBS cell surface proteins a and Rib elicit protective immunity in animal models and have been suggested as potential antigens in a vaccine against human GBS disease. Aims: To test the hypothesis that transplacentally transferred maternal antibodies to GBS proteins contribute to the protection of the neonate from GBS infection. Methods: Thirty neonates with invasive infection were included in a case-control study. IgG antibody concentrations were measured in sera from these neonates, their mothers, and from 60 non-infected controls, neonates as well as mothers. Results: A clear association was found between concentrations of antibody to proteins a and Rib neonatal and maternal sera, indicating that transplacental transfer had occurred. Moreover, low concentrations of antibodies to cc and Rib in neonatal sera were associated with invasive GBS infection caused by strains expressing the Rib protein. The odds ratio was 0.0007 (95% confidence interval 0.000 to 0.54) for antibodies to alpha and 0.002 (95% confidence interval 0.000 to 0.57) for antibodies to Rib. Conclusion: These findings support the notion that antibodies to GBS surface proteins contribute to the protection against neonatal infection.},
  author       = {Larsson, Charlotte U and Lindroth, Magnus and Nordin, P. and Stålhammar-Carlemalm, Margaretha and Lindahl, Gunnar and Krantz, I.},
  issn         = {1359-2998},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {403--408},
  publisher    = {BMJ Publishing Group},
  series       = {Archives of disease in childhood. Fetal and neonatal edition},
  title        = {Association between low concentrations of antibodies to protein alpha and Rib and invasive neonatal group B streptococcal infection},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/adc.2005.090472},
  doi          = {10.1136/adc.2005.090472},
  volume       = {91},
  year         = {2006},
}