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Evaluation of methods to estimate production, biomass and turnover of ectomycorrhizal mycelium in forests soils - A review

Wallander, Håkan LU ; Ekblad, A.; Godbold, D. L.; Johnson, D.; Bahr, Adam LU ; Baldrian, P.; Bjork, R. G.; Kieliszewska-Rokicka, B.; Kjoller, R. and Kraigher, H., et al. (2013) In Soil Biology & Biochemistry 57. p.1034-1047
Abstract
Mycorrhizal fungi constitute a considerable sink for carbon in most ecosystems. This carbon is used for building extensive mycelial networks in the soil as well as for metabolic activity related to nutrient uptake. A number of methods have been developed recently to quantify production, standing biomass and turnover of extramatrical mycorrhizal mycelia (EMM) in the field. These methods include minirhizotrons, in-growth mesh bags and cores, and indirect measurements of EMM based on classification of ectomycorrhizal fungi into exploration types. Here we review the state of the art of this methodology and discuss how it can be developed and applied most effectively in the field, Furthermore, we also discuss different ways to quantify fungal... (More)
Mycorrhizal fungi constitute a considerable sink for carbon in most ecosystems. This carbon is used for building extensive mycelial networks in the soil as well as for metabolic activity related to nutrient uptake. A number of methods have been developed recently to quantify production, standing biomass and turnover of extramatrical mycorrhizal mycelia (EMM) in the field. These methods include minirhizotrons, in-growth mesh bags and cores, and indirect measurements of EMM based on classification of ectomycorrhizal fungi into exploration types. Here we review the state of the art of this methodology and discuss how it can be developed and applied most effectively in the field, Furthermore, we also discuss different ways to quantify fungal biomass based on biomarkers such as chitin, ergosterol and PLFAs, as well as molecular methods, such as qPCR. The evidence thus far indicates that mycorrhizal fungi are key components of microbial biomass in many ecosystems. We highlight the need to extend the application of current methods to focus on a greater range of habitats and mycorrhizal types enabling incorporation of mycorrhizal fungal biomass and turnover into biogeochemical cycling models. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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keywords
Chitin, Exploration type, Ergosterol, Extramatrical mycelium, In-growth, bag, Minirhizotron, PLFA, Rhizomorphs, Sampling design, Turnover rates
in
Soil Biology & Biochemistry
volume
57
pages
1034 - 1047
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000317247100124
  • scopus:84873418369
ISSN
0038-0717
DOI
10.1016/j.soilbio.2012.08.027
project
Ectomycorrhizal fungi and apatite weathering
Ectomycorrhizal fungi and nutrient mobilisation
BECC
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3876f7c3-7cca-4307-a58e-c4b0f5252916 (old id 3739311)
date added to LUP
2013-05-21 15:56:02
date last changed
2019-10-13 03:49:14
@article{3876f7c3-7cca-4307-a58e-c4b0f5252916,
  abstract     = {Mycorrhizal fungi constitute a considerable sink for carbon in most ecosystems. This carbon is used for building extensive mycelial networks in the soil as well as for metabolic activity related to nutrient uptake. A number of methods have been developed recently to quantify production, standing biomass and turnover of extramatrical mycorrhizal mycelia (EMM) in the field. These methods include minirhizotrons, in-growth mesh bags and cores, and indirect measurements of EMM based on classification of ectomycorrhizal fungi into exploration types. Here we review the state of the art of this methodology and discuss how it can be developed and applied most effectively in the field, Furthermore, we also discuss different ways to quantify fungal biomass based on biomarkers such as chitin, ergosterol and PLFAs, as well as molecular methods, such as qPCR. The evidence thus far indicates that mycorrhizal fungi are key components of microbial biomass in many ecosystems. We highlight the need to extend the application of current methods to focus on a greater range of habitats and mycorrhizal types enabling incorporation of mycorrhizal fungal biomass and turnover into biogeochemical cycling models. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Wallander, Håkan and Ekblad, A. and Godbold, D. L. and Johnson, D. and Bahr, Adam and Baldrian, P. and Bjork, R. G. and Kieliszewska-Rokicka, B. and Kjoller, R. and Kraigher, H. and Plassard, C. and Rudawska, M.},
  issn         = {0038-0717},
  keyword      = {Chitin,Exploration type,Ergosterol,Extramatrical mycelium,In-growth,bag,Minirhizotron,PLFA,Rhizomorphs,Sampling design,Turnover rates},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1034--1047},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Soil Biology & Biochemistry},
  title        = {Evaluation of methods to estimate production, biomass and turnover of ectomycorrhizal mycelium in forests soils - A review},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2012.08.027},
  volume       = {57},
  year         = {2013},
}