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Classification of metabolic and respiratory demands in fire fighting activity with extreme workloads

Holmér, Ingvar LU and Gavhed, Desiree (2007) In Applied Ergonomics 38(1). p.45-52
Abstract
Fire fighting work comprises work tasks requiring an energy yield at maximal or close to maximal levels of the individual. Due to the very nature of fire fighting more complex physiological variables are difficult to measure. We measured metabolic and respiratory responses in 15 male.. professional fire fighters during simulated work tasks on a test ground. Work time was on the average 22 min with individual components of work tasks lasting 2-4 min. The mean oxygen consumption for the whole exercise (22 min) was 2.75 +/- 0.291/min. The most demanding work task demanded an oxygen uptake of 3.55 +/- 0.271/min. Corresponding values for respiratory minute volumes were 82 +/- 14 and 102 +/- 141/min, respectively. Heart rates averaged 168 +/- 12... (More)
Fire fighting work comprises work tasks requiring an energy yield at maximal or close to maximal levels of the individual. Due to the very nature of fire fighting more complex physiological variables are difficult to measure. We measured metabolic and respiratory responses in 15 male.. professional fire fighters during simulated work tasks on a test ground. Work time was on the average 22 min with individual components of work tasks lasting 2-4 min. The mean oxygen consumption for the whole exercise (22 min) was 2.75 +/- 0.291/min. The most demanding work task demanded an oxygen uptake of 3.55 +/- 0.271/min. Corresponding values for respiratory minute volumes were 82 +/- 14 and 102 +/- 141/min, respectively. Heart rates averaged 168 +/- 12 for the whole test and 179 +/- 13 beats/min for the heaviest work task. Two new classes for classification of intensive and exhausting, short term physical work are proposed for inclusion in ISO8996 and values for relevant parameters are proposed. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
oxygen consumption, metabolic rate, minute ventilation, physical work
in
Applied Ergonomics
volume
38
issue
1
pages
45 - 52
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000241261600006
  • scopus:33747089916
ISSN
1872-9126
DOI
10.1016/j.apergo.2006.01.004
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b4fb52db-75bd-4b5d-94f5-00e911ab37c2 (old id 388245)
date added to LUP
2007-12-12 15:49:40
date last changed
2017-11-05 04:38:59
@article{b4fb52db-75bd-4b5d-94f5-00e911ab37c2,
  abstract     = {Fire fighting work comprises work tasks requiring an energy yield at maximal or close to maximal levels of the individual. Due to the very nature of fire fighting more complex physiological variables are difficult to measure. We measured metabolic and respiratory responses in 15 male.. professional fire fighters during simulated work tasks on a test ground. Work time was on the average 22 min with individual components of work tasks lasting 2-4 min. The mean oxygen consumption for the whole exercise (22 min) was 2.75 +/- 0.291/min. The most demanding work task demanded an oxygen uptake of 3.55 +/- 0.271/min. Corresponding values for respiratory minute volumes were 82 +/- 14 and 102 +/- 141/min, respectively. Heart rates averaged 168 +/- 12 for the whole test and 179 +/- 13 beats/min for the heaviest work task. Two new classes for classification of intensive and exhausting, short term physical work are proposed for inclusion in ISO8996 and values for relevant parameters are proposed. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Holmér, Ingvar and Gavhed, Desiree},
  issn         = {1872-9126},
  keyword      = {oxygen consumption,metabolic rate,minute ventilation,physical work},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {45--52},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Applied Ergonomics},
  title        = {Classification of metabolic and respiratory demands in fire fighting activity with extreme workloads},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apergo.2006.01.004},
  volume       = {38},
  year         = {2007},
}