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Advantages and challenges with using hypoxic air venting as fire protection

Nilsson, Martin LU and Van Hees, Patrick LU (2014) In Fire and Materials 38(5). p.559-575
Abstract
The use of hypoxic air venting system as fire protection is increasing and is sometimes used to replace traditional extinguishing systems. An oxygen level of 15% is generally used because a lower concentration could pose serious health risks. On the request of the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, a literature review was conducted to determine advantages and challenges with the system and further research needs. The main advantages with a reduced oxygen environment are the reduced probability of ignition and lowered heat release rate. However, at 15% oxygen level, risk for fire still exists, and the system cannot be seen as an alternative to extinguishing systems. Reduced oxygen environment also results in higher production rates of soot... (More)
The use of hypoxic air venting system as fire protection is increasing and is sometimes used to replace traditional extinguishing systems. An oxygen level of 15% is generally used because a lower concentration could pose serious health risks. On the request of the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, a literature review was conducted to determine advantages and challenges with the system and further research needs. The main advantages with a reduced oxygen environment are the reduced probability of ignition and lowered heat release rate. However, at 15% oxygen level, risk for fire still exists, and the system cannot be seen as an alternative to extinguishing systems. Reduced oxygen environment also results in higher production rates of soot and smoke, and there is limited knowledge regarding the effect of fuel configuration and fire behavior of products. In addition, a first evaluation of the test method specified in the hypoxic air venting standards was carried out through testing. The testing showed that the particleboard passed the test criteria at normal atmosphere even though it is commonly known that a particleboard burns in normal air. It is concluded that the test method has deficiencies, and there is clearly a need for development of the test method to guarantee safety levels. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
hypoxic air venting, reduced oxygen, burning behavior, ignition, heat release rate, limiting oxygen concentration
in
Fire and Materials
volume
38
issue
5
pages
559 - 575
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000340533700004
  • scopus:84906330139
ISSN
1099-1018
DOI
10.1002/fam.2197
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e31a8c42-8c5a-429c-8e40-a13767213bd0 (old id 3971117)
date added to LUP
2013-08-15 08:39:50
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:29:18
@article{e31a8c42-8c5a-429c-8e40-a13767213bd0,
  abstract     = {The use of hypoxic air venting system as fire protection is increasing and is sometimes used to replace traditional extinguishing systems. An oxygen level of 15% is generally used because a lower concentration could pose serious health risks. On the request of the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, a literature review was conducted to determine advantages and challenges with the system and further research needs. The main advantages with a reduced oxygen environment are the reduced probability of ignition and lowered heat release rate. However, at 15% oxygen level, risk for fire still exists, and the system cannot be seen as an alternative to extinguishing systems. Reduced oxygen environment also results in higher production rates of soot and smoke, and there is limited knowledge regarding the effect of fuel configuration and fire behavior of products. In addition, a first evaluation of the test method specified in the hypoxic air venting standards was carried out through testing. The testing showed that the particleboard passed the test criteria at normal atmosphere even though it is commonly known that a particleboard burns in normal air. It is concluded that the test method has deficiencies, and there is clearly a need for development of the test method to guarantee safety levels.},
  author       = {Nilsson, Martin and Van Hees, Patrick},
  issn         = {1099-1018},
  keyword      = {hypoxic air venting,reduced oxygen,burning behavior,ignition,heat release rate,limiting oxygen concentration},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {559--575},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Fire and Materials},
  title        = {Advantages and challenges with using hypoxic air venting as fire protection},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/fam.2197},
  volume       = {38},
  year         = {2014},
}