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Mennun, starfsvettvangur og framtídarhorfur a vinnumarkadi íslenskra skurdlaekna

Gudbjartsson, Tómas; Vidarsdóttir, Halla LU and Magnússon, Sveinn (2010) In Laeknabladid 96(10). p.9-603
Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Information about the education, training and future employment prospects of Icelandic surgeons has not been available.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study included all Icelandic surgeons, in all subspecialties, educated at the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Iceland. Information on specialty training, higher academic degrees and in which country these were obtained was collected. Future employment prospects were analysed by calculating supply and demand until the year 2025. Approximations, such as sustained demand for surgeons per capita, were used.

RESULTS: Out of 237 licensed surgeons, two thirds were living in Iceland and 36 were retired. Majority (69.2%) had been trained in Sweden and orthopaedic... (More)

INTRODUCTION: Information about the education, training and future employment prospects of Icelandic surgeons has not been available.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study included all Icelandic surgeons, in all subspecialties, educated at the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Iceland. Information on specialty training, higher academic degrees and in which country these were obtained was collected. Future employment prospects were analysed by calculating supply and demand until the year 2025. Approximations, such as sustained demand for surgeons per capita, were used.

RESULTS: Out of 237 licensed surgeons, two thirds were living in Iceland and 36 were retired. Majority (69.2%) had been trained in Sweden and orthopaedic (26.9%) and general surgery (23.9%) were the most common subspecialties. The average age of surgeons in Iceland was 52 years and 44 years for surgeons abroad. Females were 8% of surgeons in Iceland while being 17.4% among 36 doctors in surgical training overseas. Over 19% had received a PhD degree. Predictions suggest that supply and demand for surgeons in Iceland will be equal in the year 2025, not taking into account the prospects for the working market outside Iceland.

CONCLUSION: A third of Icelandic surgeons live outside Iceland. The proportion of female surgeons is low but it is increasing. Our predictions indicate a balanced work market for surgeons in Iceland for the next 15 years. However, there are many uncertainty factors in the calculations and they do not predict the prospects for individual subspecialties.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
alternative title
Education, working environment and future employment prospects of Icelandic surgeons
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
keywords
Adult, Career Choice, Education, Medical, Employment, Female, Forecasting, Humans, Iceland, Licensure, Medical, Male, Middle Aged, Residence Characteristics, Retirement, Schools, Medical, Specialties, Surgical, Universities, Workplace, English Abstract, Journal Article
in
Laeknabladid
volume
96
issue
10
pages
7 pages
publisher
Læknafélag Íslands, Læknafélag Reykjavíkur
external identifiers
  • scopus:77958492385
ISSN
0023-7213
language
Icelandic
LU publication?
yes
id
3971546e-36b2-4481-943b-69819ac2120d
alternative location
http://www.laeknabladid.is/tolublod/2010/10/nr/3980
date added to LUP
2016-11-17 14:11:15
date last changed
2018-05-29 11:15:30
@article{3971546e-36b2-4481-943b-69819ac2120d,
  abstract     = {<p>INTRODUCTION: Information about the education, training and future employment prospects of Icelandic surgeons has not been available.</p><p>MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study included all Icelandic surgeons, in all subspecialties, educated at the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Iceland. Information on specialty training, higher academic degrees and in which country these were obtained was collected. Future employment prospects were analysed by calculating supply and demand until the year 2025. Approximations, such as sustained demand for surgeons per capita, were used.</p><p>RESULTS: Out of 237 licensed surgeons, two thirds were living in Iceland and 36 were retired. Majority (69.2%) had been trained in Sweden and orthopaedic (26.9%) and general surgery (23.9%) were the most common subspecialties. The average age of surgeons in Iceland was 52 years and 44 years for surgeons abroad. Females were 8% of surgeons in Iceland while being 17.4% among 36 doctors in surgical training overseas. Over 19% had received a PhD degree. Predictions suggest that supply and demand for surgeons in Iceland will be equal in the year 2025, not taking into account the prospects for the working market outside Iceland.</p><p>CONCLUSION: A third of Icelandic surgeons live outside Iceland. The proportion of female surgeons is low but it is increasing. Our predictions indicate a balanced work market for surgeons in Iceland for the next 15 years. However, there are many uncertainty factors in the calculations and they do not predict the prospects for individual subspecialties.</p>},
  author       = {Gudbjartsson, Tómas and Vidarsdóttir, Halla and Magnússon, Sveinn},
  issn         = {0023-7213},
  keyword      = {Adult,Career Choice,Education, Medical,Employment,Female,Forecasting,Humans,Iceland,Licensure, Medical,Male,Middle Aged,Residence Characteristics,Retirement,Schools, Medical,Specialties, Surgical,Universities,Workplace,English Abstract,Journal Article},
  language     = {ice},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {9--603},
  publisher    = {Læknafélag Íslands, Læknafélag Reykjavíkur},
  series       = {Laeknabladid},
  title        = {Mennun, starfsvettvangur og framtídarhorfur a vinnumarkadi íslenskra skurdlaekna},
  volume       = {96},
  year         = {2010},
}