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Modeling diesel spray ignition using detailed chemistry with a progress variable approach

Lehtiniemi, Harry LU ; Mauss, Fabian LU ; Balthasar, Michael and Magnusson, Ingemar (2006) In Combustion Science and Technology 178(10-11). p.1977-1997
Abstract
In this work, a progress variable approach is used to model diesel spray ignition with detailed chemistry. The flow field and the detailed chemistry are coupled using the flamelet assumption. A flamelet progress variable is transported by the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The progress variable source term is obtained from an unsteady flamelet library that is evaluated in each grid cell. The progress variable chosen is based on sensible enthalpy. By using an unsteady flamelet library for the progress variable, the impact of local effects, for example variations in the turbulence field, effects of wall heat transfer etc. on the autoignition chemistry can be considered on a cell level. The coupling between the unsteady flamelet... (More)
In this work, a progress variable approach is used to model diesel spray ignition with detailed chemistry. The flow field and the detailed chemistry are coupled using the flamelet assumption. A flamelet progress variable is transported by the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The progress variable source term is obtained from an unsteady flamelet library that is evaluated in each grid cell. The progress variable chosen is based on sensible enthalpy. By using an unsteady flamelet library for the progress variable, the impact of local effects, for example variations in the turbulence field, effects of wall heat transfer etc. on the autoignition chemistry can be considered on a cell level. The coupling between the unsteady flamelet library and the transport equation for total enthalpy follows the ideas of the representative interactive flamelet (RIF) approach. The method can be compared to having an interactive flamelet in each computational cell in the CFD grid. The results obtained using the proposed model are compared to results obtained using the RIF model. Differences are exhibited during the autoignition process. After ignition, the results obtained using the proposed model and RIF are virtually identical. The model was used to study lift-off lengths in sprays as function of nozzle diameter and injection pressure. A good agreement between model predictions and experimental trends was found. (Less)
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author
; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
unsteady flamelets, non-premixed combustion, progress variable
in
Combustion Science and Technology
volume
178
issue
10-11
pages
1977 - 1997
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000239921700013
  • scopus:33750381308
ISSN
1563-521X
DOI
10.1080/00102200600793148
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
08839199-90db-417c-8030-bd64ffad75e9 (old id 397520)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 12:00:04
date last changed
2021-07-21 01:42:32
@article{08839199-90db-417c-8030-bd64ffad75e9,
  abstract     = {In this work, a progress variable approach is used to model diesel spray ignition with detailed chemistry. The flow field and the detailed chemistry are coupled using the flamelet assumption. A flamelet progress variable is transported by the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The progress variable source term is obtained from an unsteady flamelet library that is evaluated in each grid cell. The progress variable chosen is based on sensible enthalpy. By using an unsteady flamelet library for the progress variable, the impact of local effects, for example variations in the turbulence field, effects of wall heat transfer etc. on the autoignition chemistry can be considered on a cell level. The coupling between the unsteady flamelet library and the transport equation for total enthalpy follows the ideas of the representative interactive flamelet (RIF) approach. The method can be compared to having an interactive flamelet in each computational cell in the CFD grid. The results obtained using the proposed model are compared to results obtained using the RIF model. Differences are exhibited during the autoignition process. After ignition, the results obtained using the proposed model and RIF are virtually identical. The model was used to study lift-off lengths in sprays as function of nozzle diameter and injection pressure. A good agreement between model predictions and experimental trends was found.},
  author       = {Lehtiniemi, Harry and Mauss, Fabian and Balthasar, Michael and Magnusson, Ingemar},
  issn         = {1563-521X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10-11},
  pages        = {1977--1997},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Combustion Science and Technology},
  title        = {Modeling diesel spray ignition using detailed chemistry with a progress variable approach},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00102200600793148},
  doi          = {10.1080/00102200600793148},
  volume       = {178},
  year         = {2006},
}