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Active centers, catalytic behavior, symbiosis and redox properties of MoV(Nb,Ta)TeO ammoxidation catalysts

Grasselli, Robert K. ; Buttrey, Douglas J. ; Burrington, James D. ; Andersson, Arne LU ; Holmberg, Johan LU ; Ueda, Wataru ; Kubo, Jun ; Lugmair, Claus G. and Volpe, Anthony F., Jr. (2006) In Topics in Catalysis 38(1-3). p.7-16
Abstract
Selective as well as waste forming active centers were defined for MoVNbTeO and MoVTaTeO catalysts in the ammoxidation of propane to acrylonitrile and all catalytic functionalities were assigned to specific elements at the respective active centers. Symbiosis between M1 and M2 phases of these catalysts was observed, with phase cooperation being more extensive in the Nb than Ta containing compositions. The difference in catalytic effectiveness arises most likely because contact and surface area exposure of the two respective, cooperating phase pairs are not equal. The M1 phase of the catalysts is reducible by propane and ammonia in the absence of dioxygen and is regenerable to its original, fully oxidized state by dioxygen (air). No... (More)
Selective as well as waste forming active centers were defined for MoVNbTeO and MoVTaTeO catalysts in the ammoxidation of propane to acrylonitrile and all catalytic functionalities were assigned to specific elements at the respective active centers. Symbiosis between M1 and M2 phases of these catalysts was observed, with phase cooperation being more extensive in the Nb than Ta containing compositions. The difference in catalytic effectiveness arises most likely because contact and surface area exposure of the two respective, cooperating phase pairs are not equal. The M1 phase of the catalysts is reducible by propane and ammonia in the absence of dioxygen and is regenerable to its original, fully oxidized state by dioxygen (air). No structural collapse is observed even after 120 C3H8 + NH3 reduction pulses. The so induced reduction of the catalyst extends up to 70 layers deep. The product distribution over the first few pulses is very similar to that under catalytic conditions, supporting the concept that lattice oxygen is involved in the catalytic ammoxidation process. Therefore, the ammoxidation of paraffins is a redox process, as is of course the well-known olefin ammoxidation process. (Less)
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author
; ; ; ; ; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Ta)TeO, (MoW)VTeO, MoV(Nb, redox, symbiosis, acrylonitrile, ammoxidation, propane
in
Topics in Catalysis
volume
38
issue
1-3
pages
7 - 16
publisher
Kluwer
external identifiers
  • wos:000239592200003
  • scopus:33749079702
ISSN
1572-9028
DOI
10.1007/s11244-006-0066-x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
61be0c4d-2187-4c1e-84f5-cb53eed4c208 (old id 398623)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 15:42:20
date last changed
2021-08-11 01:17:03
@article{61be0c4d-2187-4c1e-84f5-cb53eed4c208,
  abstract     = {Selective as well as waste forming active centers were defined for MoVNbTeO and MoVTaTeO catalysts in the ammoxidation of propane to acrylonitrile and all catalytic functionalities were assigned to specific elements at the respective active centers. Symbiosis between M1 and M2 phases of these catalysts was observed, with phase cooperation being more extensive in the Nb than Ta containing compositions. The difference in catalytic effectiveness arises most likely because contact and surface area exposure of the two respective, cooperating phase pairs are not equal. The M1 phase of the catalysts is reducible by propane and ammonia in the absence of dioxygen and is regenerable to its original, fully oxidized state by dioxygen (air). No structural collapse is observed even after 120 C3H8 + NH3 reduction pulses. The so induced reduction of the catalyst extends up to 70 layers deep. The product distribution over the first few pulses is very similar to that under catalytic conditions, supporting the concept that lattice oxygen is involved in the catalytic ammoxidation process. Therefore, the ammoxidation of paraffins is a redox process, as is of course the well-known olefin ammoxidation process.},
  author       = {Grasselli, Robert K. and Buttrey, Douglas J. and Burrington, James D. and Andersson, Arne and Holmberg, Johan and Ueda, Wataru and Kubo, Jun and Lugmair, Claus G. and Volpe, Anthony F., Jr.},
  issn         = {1572-9028},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-3},
  pages        = {7--16},
  publisher    = {Kluwer},
  series       = {Topics in Catalysis},
  title        = {Active centers, catalytic behavior, symbiosis and redox properties of MoV(Nb,Ta)TeO ammoxidation catalysts},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11244-006-0066-x},
  doi          = {10.1007/s11244-006-0066-x},
  volume       = {38},
  year         = {2006},
}