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Developing a Grounded Theory on Adaptation After Lung Transplantation From Intermediate-Term Patient Experiences

Lundmark, Martina LU ; Lennerling, Annette and Forsberg, Anna LU (2019) In Progress in Transplantation 29(2). p.135-143
Abstract

Background: Previous research revealed that it is possible for lung recipients to experience health 1 year posttransplant, despite not being fully recovered. However, an in-depth, long-term perspective on how lung recipients’ health transition evolves over time is lacking. Thus, the aim of this study was to further develop a grounded theory of health transition by exploring the process of change 1 to 3 years after lung transplantation. Methods: The grounded theory method was used prospectively to analyze the narratives of 14 adult lung recipients who were included at their 1-year follow-up and reinterviewed 2 years later. Results: This novel study contributes an in-depth understanding of the adaptation process after lung... (More)

Background: Previous research revealed that it is possible for lung recipients to experience health 1 year posttransplant, despite not being fully recovered. However, an in-depth, long-term perspective on how lung recipients’ health transition evolves over time is lacking. Thus, the aim of this study was to further develop a grounded theory of health transition by exploring the process of change 1 to 3 years after lung transplantation. Methods: The grounded theory method was used prospectively to analyze the narratives of 14 adult lung recipients who were included at their 1-year follow-up and reinterviewed 2 years later. Results: This novel study contributes an in-depth understanding of the adaptation process after lung transplantation. The greatest concern in the 3 years after lung transplantation was adaptation to a new normality, which was achieved by 3 main strategies: compare, accept, and adjust. Adaptation to a new normality involved understanding that one’s previous life no longer exists and that a new way of living requires adaptation. Successful adaptation resulted in the experience of health and well-being, whereas too many symptoms and limitations in everyday life led to difficulties and a profound sense of illness. Conclusions: Lung recipients can experience health, despite symptoms and complications by adapting to a new normality. This individual process begins posttransplant and continues throughout life.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
adaptation, grounded theory, lung transplantation, nursing, posttransplant follow-up, qualitative, recovery
in
Progress in Transplantation
volume
29
issue
2
pages
135 - 143
publisher
SAGE Publications Inc.
external identifiers
  • scopus:85063589790
ISSN
1526-9248
DOI
10.1177/1526924819835823
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3a3c15e3-f5ec-450b-b233-387f799885ca
date added to LUP
2019-04-08 14:33:11
date last changed
2019-06-28 10:31:23
@article{3a3c15e3-f5ec-450b-b233-387f799885ca,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Previous research revealed that it is possible for lung recipients to experience health 1 year posttransplant, despite not being fully recovered. However, an in-depth, long-term perspective on how lung recipients’ health transition evolves over time is lacking. Thus, the aim of this study was to further develop a grounded theory of health transition by exploring the process of change 1 to 3 years after lung transplantation. Methods: The grounded theory method was used prospectively to analyze the narratives of 14 adult lung recipients who were included at their 1-year follow-up and reinterviewed 2 years later. Results: This novel study contributes an in-depth understanding of the adaptation process after lung transplantation. The greatest concern in the 3 years after lung transplantation was adaptation to a new normality, which was achieved by 3 main strategies: compare, accept, and adjust. Adaptation to a new normality involved understanding that one’s previous life no longer exists and that a new way of living requires adaptation. Successful adaptation resulted in the experience of health and well-being, whereas too many symptoms and limitations in everyday life led to difficulties and a profound sense of illness. Conclusions: Lung recipients can experience health, despite symptoms and complications by adapting to a new normality. This individual process begins posttransplant and continues throughout life.</p>},
  author       = {Lundmark, Martina and Lennerling, Annette and Forsberg, Anna},
  issn         = {1526-9248},
  keyword      = {adaptation,grounded theory,lung transplantation,nursing,posttransplant follow-up,qualitative,recovery},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {03},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {135--143},
  publisher    = {SAGE Publications Inc.},
  series       = {Progress in Transplantation},
  title        = {Developing a Grounded Theory on Adaptation After Lung Transplantation From Intermediate-Term Patient Experiences},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1526924819835823},
  volume       = {29},
  year         = {2019},
}