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Increased reduction in fasting C-peptide is associated with islet cell antibodies in Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients

Marner, B. ; Agner, T. ; Binder, C. ; Lernmark, Å LU ; Nerup, J. LU ; Mandrup-Poulsen, T. and Walldorff, S. (1985) In Diabetologia 28(12). p.875-880
Abstract

A cohort of 82 patients with Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes was followed prospectively for 24 months, and 54 of them for 30 months, to study the relationship between fasting levels of immunoreactive C-peptide and titres of islet cell antibodies. After diagnosis, fasting C-peptide rose temporarily for 1-6 months of insulin therapy and declined continuously thereafter. While islet cell antibodies were present among 55% of the newly diagnosed patients, only 31% remained positive at 30 months. Their antibody titres decreased from 1:81 at diagnosis to 1:3. Only 3 patients (4%) who were islet cell antibody negative at diagnosis became positive later. The median C-peptide values among the persistently islet cell antibody positive patients... (More)

A cohort of 82 patients with Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes was followed prospectively for 24 months, and 54 of them for 30 months, to study the relationship between fasting levels of immunoreactive C-peptide and titres of islet cell antibodies. After diagnosis, fasting C-peptide rose temporarily for 1-6 months of insulin therapy and declined continuously thereafter. While islet cell antibodies were present among 55% of the newly diagnosed patients, only 31% remained positive at 30 months. Their antibody titres decreased from 1:81 at diagnosis to 1:3. Only 3 patients (4%) who were islet cell antibody negative at diagnosis became positive later. The median C-peptide values among the persistently islet cell antibody positive patients decreased from 0.11 pmol/ml at 18 months, to 0.09 pmol/ml at 24 months, to 0.06 pmol/ml at 30 months compared to 0.18 (p=0.04), 0.15 (p=0.05) and 0.16 (p< 0.003) pmol/ml, respectively, for the islet cell antibody negative patients. The median slope for the latter was -0.09 compared to -0.19 for the islet cell antibody positive patients (p=0.01). These differences were reflected in increasing dosages of insulin, since patients remaining antibody-positive for 30 months were given 1.3-1.4 times more insulin (p=0.01-0.004) than the antibody negative patients. This study demonstrates that islet cell antibodies may be a useful marker for predicting an increased rate by which endogenous B cell function is lost in Type 1 diabetes.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
keywords
fasting blood sugar, fasting C-peptide, insulin dosage, islet cell antibodies, prospective analysis, Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes
in
Diabetologia
volume
28
issue
12
pages
6 pages
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:0022296677
  • pmid:3912242
ISSN
0012-186X
DOI
10.1007/BF00703129
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
3a6352d3-afa8-4b55-ae58-3563c369b992
date added to LUP
2019-09-16 12:36:25
date last changed
2020-02-23 08:03:37
@article{3a6352d3-afa8-4b55-ae58-3563c369b992,
  abstract     = {<p>A cohort of 82 patients with Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes was followed prospectively for 24 months, and 54 of them for 30 months, to study the relationship between fasting levels of immunoreactive C-peptide and titres of islet cell antibodies. After diagnosis, fasting C-peptide rose temporarily for 1-6 months of insulin therapy and declined continuously thereafter. While islet cell antibodies were present among 55% of the newly diagnosed patients, only 31% remained positive at 30 months. Their antibody titres decreased from 1:81 at diagnosis to 1:3. Only 3 patients (4%) who were islet cell antibody negative at diagnosis became positive later. The median C-peptide values among the persistently islet cell antibody positive patients decreased from 0.11 pmol/ml at 18 months, to 0.09 pmol/ml at 24 months, to 0.06 pmol/ml at 30 months compared to 0.18 (p=0.04), 0.15 (p=0.05) and 0.16 (p&lt; 0.003) pmol/ml, respectively, for the islet cell antibody negative patients. The median slope for the latter was -0.09 compared to -0.19 for the islet cell antibody positive patients (p=0.01). These differences were reflected in increasing dosages of insulin, since patients remaining antibody-positive for 30 months were given 1.3-1.4 times more insulin (p=0.01-0.004) than the antibody negative patients. This study demonstrates that islet cell antibodies may be a useful marker for predicting an increased rate by which endogenous B cell function is lost in Type 1 diabetes.</p>},
  author       = {Marner, B. and Agner, T. and Binder, C. and Lernmark, Å and Nerup, J. and Mandrup-Poulsen, T. and Walldorff, S.},
  issn         = {0012-186X},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {12},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {875--880},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Diabetologia},
  title        = {Increased reduction in fasting C-peptide is associated with islet cell antibodies in Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00703129},
  doi          = {10.1007/BF00703129},
  volume       = {28},
  year         = {1985},
}