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Asymmetric optokinetic afterresponse in patients with vestibular neuritis

Brantberg, K and Magnusson, M LU (1990) In Journal of Vestibular Research: Equilibrium and Orientation 1(3). p.89-279
Abstract

The symmetry of primary and secondary optokinetic afternystagmus (OKAN I and OKAN II, respectively) was studied in 14 patients with vestibular neuritis, as well as in 50 normals. The patients were examined at onset of symptoms and at follow-up 3 and 12 months later. At onset, OKAN was found mainly to reflect the spontaneous nystagmus. Although the spontaneous nystagmus disappeared in all patients within 3 months, both OKAN I and OKAN II was asymmetric at the 3- and 12-month check-ups. OKAN beating toward the lesioned ear was weaker than the OKAN beating toward the healthy ear. Thus, the asymmetric vestibular function was reflected not only in the OKAN I, but also by an asymmetry in OKAN II. Between the 3- and 12-month check-ups,... (More)

The symmetry of primary and secondary optokinetic afternystagmus (OKAN I and OKAN II, respectively) was studied in 14 patients with vestibular neuritis, as well as in 50 normals. The patients were examined at onset of symptoms and at follow-up 3 and 12 months later. At onset, OKAN was found mainly to reflect the spontaneous nystagmus. Although the spontaneous nystagmus disappeared in all patients within 3 months, both OKAN I and OKAN II was asymmetric at the 3- and 12-month check-ups. OKAN beating toward the lesioned ear was weaker than the OKAN beating toward the healthy ear. Thus, the asymmetric vestibular function was reflected not only in the OKAN I, but also by an asymmetry in OKAN II. Between the 3- and 12-month check-ups, asymmetry in OKAN declined, even among those patients who showed no improvement in caloric response during that time. The decreasing asymmetry in OKAN with time after lesion was, however, related to the disappearance of a positional nystagmus. Hence, the results may be interpreted as suggesting OKAN not only to be affected by vestibular side-difference, but also to be modified by the process responsible for vestibular compensation following a peripheral vestibular lesion.

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Contribution to journal
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published
subject
keywords
Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Caloric Tests, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Neuritis, Nystagmus, Optokinetic, Vestibular Nerve, Vestibulocochlear Nerve Diseases, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
in
Journal of Vestibular Research: Equilibrium and Orientation
volume
1
issue
3
pages
89 - 279
publisher
IOS Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:0025574127
ISSN
0957-4271
language
English
LU publication?
yes
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3c554864-a5f7-489d-bf58-aff2475f3280
date added to LUP
2017-05-03 12:51:53
date last changed
2017-07-30 05:24:43
@article{3c554864-a5f7-489d-bf58-aff2475f3280,
  abstract     = {<p>The symmetry of primary and secondary optokinetic afternystagmus (OKAN I and OKAN II, respectively) was studied in 14 patients with vestibular neuritis, as well as in 50 normals. The patients were examined at onset of symptoms and at follow-up 3 and 12 months later. At onset, OKAN was found mainly to reflect the spontaneous nystagmus. Although the spontaneous nystagmus disappeared in all patients within 3 months, both OKAN I and OKAN II was asymmetric at the 3- and 12-month check-ups. OKAN beating toward the lesioned ear was weaker than the OKAN beating toward the healthy ear. Thus, the asymmetric vestibular function was reflected not only in the OKAN I, but also by an asymmetry in OKAN II. Between the 3- and 12-month check-ups, asymmetry in OKAN declined, even among those patients who showed no improvement in caloric response during that time. The decreasing asymmetry in OKAN with time after lesion was, however, related to the disappearance of a positional nystagmus. Hence, the results may be interpreted as suggesting OKAN not only to be affected by vestibular side-difference, but also to be modified by the process responsible for vestibular compensation following a peripheral vestibular lesion.</p>},
  author       = {Brantberg, K and Magnusson, M},
  issn         = {0957-4271},
  keyword      = {Adolescent,Adult,Aged,Caloric Tests,Female,Follow-Up Studies,Humans,Male,Middle Aged,Neuritis,Nystagmus, Optokinetic,Vestibular Nerve,Vestibulocochlear Nerve Diseases,Journal Article,Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {01},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {89--279},
  publisher    = {IOS Press},
  series       = {Journal of Vestibular Research: Equilibrium and Orientation},
  title        = {Asymmetric optokinetic afterresponse in patients with vestibular neuritis},
  volume       = {1},
  year         = {1990},
}