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Acclimation of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound Emission From Subarctic Heath Under Long-Term Moderate Warming

Tang, J. LU ; Valolahti, H.; Kivimäenpää, M.; Michelsen, A. and Rinnan, R. LU (2018) In Journal of Geophysical Research - Biogeosciences 123(1). p.95-105
Abstract

Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from subarctic ecosystems have shown to increase drastically in response to a long-term temperature increase of only 2°C. We assessed whether this increase takes place already after 3 years of warming and how the increase changes over time. To test this, we measured BVOC emissions and CO2 fluxes in a field experiment on a subarctic wet heath, where ecosystem plots were subjected to passive warming by open top chambers for 3 (OTC3) or 13 years (OTC13) or were kept as unmanipulated controls. Already after 3 years of moderate temperature increase of 1–2°C, warming increased the emissions of isoprene (five- to sixfold) and monoterpenes (three- to fourfold) from the subarctic... (More)

Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from subarctic ecosystems have shown to increase drastically in response to a long-term temperature increase of only 2°C. We assessed whether this increase takes place already after 3 years of warming and how the increase changes over time. To test this, we measured BVOC emissions and CO2 fluxes in a field experiment on a subarctic wet heath, where ecosystem plots were subjected to passive warming by open top chambers for 3 (OTC3) or 13 years (OTC13) or were kept as unmanipulated controls. Already after 3 years of moderate temperature increase of 1–2°C, warming increased the emissions of isoprene (five- to sixfold) and monoterpenes (three- to fourfold) from the subarctic heath. The several-fold higher BVOC emissions in the warmed plots are likely a result of increased vegetation biomass and altered vegetation composition as a shift in the species coverage was observed already after 3 years of warming. Warming also increased gross ecosystem production and ecosystem respiration, but the increases were much lower than those for BVOCs. Our results demonstrate that the strong BVOC responses to warming already appeared after 3 years, and the BVOC and CO2 fluxes had acclimated to this warming after 3 years, showing no differences with another 10 years of warming. This finding has important implications for predicting CO2 and BVOC fluxes in subarctic ecosystems.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Arctic, BVOC, climate change, CO exchange, isoprene, tundra
in
Journal of Geophysical Research - Biogeosciences
volume
123
issue
1
pages
11 pages
publisher
American Geophysical Union
external identifiers
  • scopus:85042231810
ISSN
2169-8953
DOI
10.1002/2017JG004139
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3cb8f3d8-e584-493a-943e-a67efba2468b
date added to LUP
2019-06-12 22:05:59
date last changed
2019-08-14 04:39:40
@article{3cb8f3d8-e584-493a-943e-a67efba2468b,
  abstract     = {<p>Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from subarctic ecosystems have shown to increase drastically in response to a long-term temperature increase of only 2°C. We assessed whether this increase takes place already after 3 years of warming and how the increase changes over time. To test this, we measured BVOC emissions and CO<sub>2</sub> fluxes in a field experiment on a subarctic wet heath, where ecosystem plots were subjected to passive warming by open top chambers for 3 (OTC3) or 13 years (OTC13) or were kept as unmanipulated controls. Already after 3 years of moderate temperature increase of 1–2°C, warming increased the emissions of isoprene (five- to sixfold) and monoterpenes (three- to fourfold) from the subarctic heath. The several-fold higher BVOC emissions in the warmed plots are likely a result of increased vegetation biomass and altered vegetation composition as a shift in the species coverage was observed already after 3 years of warming. Warming also increased gross ecosystem production and ecosystem respiration, but the increases were much lower than those for BVOCs. Our results demonstrate that the strong BVOC responses to warming already appeared after 3 years, and the BVOC and CO<sub>2</sub> fluxes had acclimated to this warming after 3 years, showing no differences with another 10 years of warming. This finding has important implications for predicting CO<sub>2</sub> and BVOC fluxes in subarctic ecosystems.</p>},
  author       = {Tang, J. and Valolahti, H. and Kivimäenpää, M. and Michelsen, A. and Rinnan, R.},
  issn         = {2169-8953},
  keyword      = {Arctic,BVOC,climate change,CO exchange,isoprene,tundra},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {01},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {95--105},
  publisher    = {American Geophysical Union},
  series       = {Journal of Geophysical Research - Biogeosciences},
  title        = {Acclimation of  Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound Emission From Subarctic Heath Under Long-Term Moderate Warming},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2017JG004139},
  volume       = {123},
  year         = {2018},
}