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Polyporales brown rot species Fomitopsis pinicola : Enzyme activity profiles, oxalic acid production, and Fe3+-reducing metabolite secretion

Shah, Firoz LU ; Mali, Tuulia and Lundell, Taina K. (2018) In Applied and Environmental Microbiology 84(8).
Abstract

Basidiomycota fungi in the order Polyporales are specified to decomposition of dead wood and woody debris and thereby are crucial players in the degradation of organic matter and cycling of carbon in the forest ecosystems. Polyporales wood-decaying species comprise both white rot and brown rot fungi, based on their mode of wood decay. While the white rot fungi are able to attack and decompose all the lignocellulose biopolymers, the brown rot species mainly cause the destruction of wood polysaccharides, with minor modification of the lignin units. The biochemical mechanism of brown rot decay of wood is still unclear and has been proposed to include a combination of nonenzymatic oxidation reactions and carbohydrateactive enzymes.... (More)

Basidiomycota fungi in the order Polyporales are specified to decomposition of dead wood and woody debris and thereby are crucial players in the degradation of organic matter and cycling of carbon in the forest ecosystems. Polyporales wood-decaying species comprise both white rot and brown rot fungi, based on their mode of wood decay. While the white rot fungi are able to attack and decompose all the lignocellulose biopolymers, the brown rot species mainly cause the destruction of wood polysaccharides, with minor modification of the lignin units. The biochemical mechanism of brown rot decay of wood is still unclear and has been proposed to include a combination of nonenzymatic oxidation reactions and carbohydrateactive enzymes. Therefore, a linking approach is needed to dissect the fungal brown rot processes. We studied the brown rot Polyporales species Fomitopsis pinicola by following mycelial growth and enzyme activity patterns and generating metabolites together with Fenton-promoting Fe3+-reducing activity for 3 months in submerged cultures supplemented with spruce wood. Enzyme activities to degrade hemicellulose, cellulose, proteins, and chitin were produced by three Finnish isolates of F. pinicola. Substantial secretion of oxalic acid and a decrease in pH were notable. Aromatic compounds and metabolites were observed to accumulate in the fungal cultures, with some metabolites having Fe3+-reducing activity. Thus, F. pinicola demonstrates a pattern of strong mycelial growth leading to the active production of carbohydrate- and protein-active enzymes, together with the promotion of Fenton biochemistry. Our findings point to fungal species-level "fine-tuning" and variations in the biochemical reactions leading to the brown rot type of wood decay.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Agaricomycetes, Basidiomycetes, Biodegradation, Brown rot, Fenton reaction, Fungal enzymes, Lignocellulose, Oxalic acid, Polyporales, Wood decay fungi
in
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
volume
84
issue
8
pages
14 pages
publisher
American Society for Microbiology
external identifiers
  • scopus:85044857041
ISSN
0099-2240
DOI
10.1128/AEM.02662-17
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
3d24e1ef-aa87-4085-8f85-4c4aa9c24080
date added to LUP
2019-02-27 14:25:46
date last changed
2019-10-15 06:59:17
@article{3d24e1ef-aa87-4085-8f85-4c4aa9c24080,
  abstract     = {<p>Basidiomycota fungi in the order Polyporales are specified to decomposition of dead wood and woody debris and thereby are crucial players in the degradation of organic matter and cycling of carbon in the forest ecosystems. Polyporales wood-decaying species comprise both white rot and brown rot fungi, based on their mode of wood decay. While the white rot fungi are able to attack and decompose all the lignocellulose biopolymers, the brown rot species mainly cause the destruction of wood polysaccharides, with minor modification of the lignin units. The biochemical mechanism of brown rot decay of wood is still unclear and has been proposed to include a combination of nonenzymatic oxidation reactions and carbohydrateactive enzymes. Therefore, a linking approach is needed to dissect the fungal brown rot processes. We studied the brown rot Polyporales species Fomitopsis pinicola by following mycelial growth and enzyme activity patterns and generating metabolites together with Fenton-promoting Fe<sup>3+</sup>-reducing activity for 3 months in submerged cultures supplemented with spruce wood. Enzyme activities to degrade hemicellulose, cellulose, proteins, and chitin were produced by three Finnish isolates of F. pinicola. Substantial secretion of oxalic acid and a decrease in pH were notable. Aromatic compounds and metabolites were observed to accumulate in the fungal cultures, with some metabolites having Fe<sup>3+</sup>-reducing activity. Thus, F. pinicola demonstrates a pattern of strong mycelial growth leading to the active production of carbohydrate- and protein-active enzymes, together with the promotion of Fenton biochemistry. Our findings point to fungal species-level "fine-tuning" and variations in the biochemical reactions leading to the brown rot type of wood decay.</p>},
  articleno    = {e02662-17},
  author       = {Shah, Firoz and Mali, Tuulia and Lundell, Taina K.},
  issn         = {0099-2240},
  keyword      = {Agaricomycetes,Basidiomycetes,Biodegradation,Brown rot,Fenton reaction,Fungal enzymes,Lignocellulose,Oxalic acid,Polyporales,Wood decay fungi},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {04},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {14},
  publisher    = {American Society for Microbiology},
  series       = {Applied and Environmental Microbiology},
  title        = {Polyporales brown rot species Fomitopsis pinicola : Enzyme activity profiles, oxalic acid production, and Fe<sup>3+</sup>-reducing metabolite secretion},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.02662-17},
  volume       = {84},
  year         = {2018},
}