Advanced

PDGF-A/PDGF alpha-receptor signaling is required for lung growth and the formation of alveoli but not for early lung branching morphogenesis.

Ehrencrona, Hans LU ; Gritli-Linde, Amel and Betsholtz, Christer (2002) In Developmental Dynamics 223(1). p.155-162
Abstract
Platelet-derived growth factors (PDGF) constitute a family of four gene products (PDGF-A-D) acting by means of two receptor tyrosine kinases, PDGFR alpha and beta. Three of the ligands (PDGF-A, -B, and -C) bind to PDGFR alpha with high affinity. Knockout of pdgf-a in mice has demonstrated a role for PDGF-A in the recruitment of smooth muscle cells to the alveolar sacs and their further compartmentalization into alveoli. Although this is a late, postnatal step in lung development, pdgf-a antisense oligonucleotides were previously shown to inhibit epithelial branching in rat lung explants in vitro, which reflects an early embryonic process. These conflicting results may be explained by substitution of genetic loss of pdgf-a by maternal... (More)
Platelet-derived growth factors (PDGF) constitute a family of four gene products (PDGF-A-D) acting by means of two receptor tyrosine kinases, PDGFR alpha and beta. Three of the ligands (PDGF-A, -B, and -C) bind to PDGFR alpha with high affinity. Knockout of pdgf-a in mice has demonstrated a role for PDGF-A in the recruitment of smooth muscle cells to the alveolar sacs and their further compartmentalization into alveoli. Although this is a late, postnatal step in lung development, pdgf-a antisense oligonucleotides were previously shown to inhibit epithelial branching in rat lung explants in vitro, which reflects an early embryonic process. These conflicting results may be explained by substitution of genetic loss of pdgf-a by maternal transfer of PDGF-A to the knockout embryo or the presence of other PDGFR alpha agonists (PDGF-B and -C) in vivo, potentially masking an effect of PDGF-A on branching morphogenesis. Alternatively, the administration of pdgf-a antisense oligonucleotides affected other processes than the intended. To discriminate between these opposing possibilities, we have analyzed lung development in pdgfr alpha -/- embryos and lung primordia grown in vitro. Our analysis shows that, while the pdgfr alpha -/- lungs and explanted lung rudiments were smaller than normal, branching morphogenesis appears qualitatively intact and proceeds until at least embryonic day 15.5, generating both prospective conducting and respiratory airways. We conclude that, although PDGF-AA signaling over PDGFR alpha may have direct or indirect roles in overall lung growth, it does not specifically control early branching of the lung epithelium. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Platelet-Derived Growth Factor, Organ Culture Techniques, Morphogenesis, Knockout, Mice, Animals, Lung, Receptor, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor alpha, Signal Transduction
in
Developmental Dynamics
volume
223
issue
1
pages
155 - 162
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • scopus:0036139578
ISSN
1097-0177
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
5b819b8a-cd9c-4901-be26-45a92af22f09 (old id 4021888)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11803579
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/dvdy.1225
date added to LUP
2013-10-21 10:53:12
date last changed
2017-11-12 04:06:56
@article{5b819b8a-cd9c-4901-be26-45a92af22f09,
  abstract     = {Platelet-derived growth factors (PDGF) constitute a family of four gene products (PDGF-A-D) acting by means of two receptor tyrosine kinases, PDGFR alpha and beta. Three of the ligands (PDGF-A, -B, and -C) bind to PDGFR alpha with high affinity. Knockout of pdgf-a in mice has demonstrated a role for PDGF-A in the recruitment of smooth muscle cells to the alveolar sacs and their further compartmentalization into alveoli. Although this is a late, postnatal step in lung development, pdgf-a antisense oligonucleotides were previously shown to inhibit epithelial branching in rat lung explants in vitro, which reflects an early embryonic process. These conflicting results may be explained by substitution of genetic loss of pdgf-a by maternal transfer of PDGF-A to the knockout embryo or the presence of other PDGFR alpha agonists (PDGF-B and -C) in vivo, potentially masking an effect of PDGF-A on branching morphogenesis. Alternatively, the administration of pdgf-a antisense oligonucleotides affected other processes than the intended. To discriminate between these opposing possibilities, we have analyzed lung development in pdgfr alpha -/- embryos and lung primordia grown in vitro. Our analysis shows that, while the pdgfr alpha -/- lungs and explanted lung rudiments were smaller than normal, branching morphogenesis appears qualitatively intact and proceeds until at least embryonic day 15.5, generating both prospective conducting and respiratory airways. We conclude that, although PDGF-AA signaling over PDGFR alpha may have direct or indirect roles in overall lung growth, it does not specifically control early branching of the lung epithelium.},
  author       = {Ehrencrona, Hans and Gritli-Linde, Amel and Betsholtz, Christer},
  issn         = {1097-0177},
  keyword      = {Platelet-Derived Growth Factor,Organ Culture Techniques,Morphogenesis,Knockout,Mice,Animals,Lung,Receptor,Platelet-Derived Growth Factor alpha,Signal Transduction},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {155--162},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Developmental Dynamics},
  title        = {PDGF-A/PDGF alpha-receptor signaling is required for lung growth and the formation of alveoli but not for early lung branching morphogenesis.},
  volume       = {223},
  year         = {2002},
}