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Changes in physical workload with implementation of mouse-based information technology in air traffic control

Arvidsson, Inger LU ; Hansson, Gert-Åke LU ; Mathiassen, Svend Erik and Skerfving, Staffan LU (2006) In International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics 36(7). p.613-622
Abstract
Effects on physical workload were quantified when introducing new information technology in air traffic control. Seven female and 7 male air traffic controllers were studied in an old control system, and during simulated-but similar-work in a new, mouse-based system. Postures, movements and muscular load were recorded (inclinometry for head, neck, back and upper arms; goniometry for wrists; elect romyography for the trapezius and forearm extensor muscles). The new system was associated with lower movement velocities than the old one (examples: [50th percentiles] head flexion: 2 vs. 5 degrees/s, P < 0.01; right arm elevation: 3 vs. 6 degrees/s; P < 0.01; [90th percentile] wrist flexion: 19 vs. 50 degrees/s, P < 0.01), less varying... (More)
Effects on physical workload were quantified when introducing new information technology in air traffic control. Seven female and 7 male air traffic controllers were studied in an old control system, and during simulated-but similar-work in a new, mouse-based system. Postures, movements and muscular load were recorded (inclinometry for head, neck, back and upper arms; goniometry for wrists; elect romyography for the trapezius and forearm extensor muscles). The new system was associated with lower movement velocities than the old one (examples: [50th percentiles] head flexion: 2 vs. 5 degrees/s, P < 0.01; right arm elevation: 3 vs. 6 degrees/s; P < 0.01; [90th percentile] wrist flexion: 19 vs. 50 degrees/s, P < 0.01), less varying postures (head: 95th-5th percentile range 17 degrees vs. 34 degrees; P < 0.01), and less muscular rest in the right forearm extensors (3.5% vs. 9% of time; P < 0.05). The old/new system differences were amplified at high work intensities. The new air traffic control system caused a major change of physical exposures, probably associated with an increased risk of musculoskeletal disorders in arms and hands. Relevance to industry While this study concerned the specific changes in the introduction of a new air traffic control system, we believe that the findings are applicable to similar technological developments in other settings. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
technical measurements, muscular load, movements, posture, computer work, visual display unit
in
International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics
volume
36
issue
7
pages
613 - 622
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000238878900001
  • scopus:33745143600
ISSN
0169-8141
DOI
10.1016/j.ergon.2006.03.002
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e2762e85-354d-4efd-b93c-68158917d4da (old id 404128)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 16:06:10
date last changed
2021-09-01 04:11:46
@article{e2762e85-354d-4efd-b93c-68158917d4da,
  abstract     = {Effects on physical workload were quantified when introducing new information technology in air traffic control. Seven female and 7 male air traffic controllers were studied in an old control system, and during simulated-but similar-work in a new, mouse-based system. Postures, movements and muscular load were recorded (inclinometry for head, neck, back and upper arms; goniometry for wrists; elect romyography for the trapezius and forearm extensor muscles). The new system was associated with lower movement velocities than the old one (examples: [50th percentiles] head flexion: 2 vs. 5 degrees/s, P &lt; 0.01; right arm elevation: 3 vs. 6 degrees/s; P &lt; 0.01; [90th percentile] wrist flexion: 19 vs. 50 degrees/s, P &lt; 0.01), less varying postures (head: 95th-5th percentile range 17 degrees vs. 34 degrees; P &lt; 0.01), and less muscular rest in the right forearm extensors (3.5% vs. 9% of time; P &lt; 0.05). The old/new system differences were amplified at high work intensities. The new air traffic control system caused a major change of physical exposures, probably associated with an increased risk of musculoskeletal disorders in arms and hands. Relevance to industry While this study concerned the specific changes in the introduction of a new air traffic control system, we believe that the findings are applicable to similar technological developments in other settings. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Arvidsson, Inger and Hansson, Gert-Åke and Mathiassen, Svend Erik and Skerfving, Staffan},
  issn         = {0169-8141},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {613--622},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics},
  title        = {Changes in physical workload with implementation of mouse-based information technology in air traffic control},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ergon.2006.03.002},
  doi          = {10.1016/j.ergon.2006.03.002},
  volume       = {36},
  year         = {2006},
}