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In vivo and in vitro evolution of molecular mechanisms - Importance in B cell development and phage display

Nilsson, Nina LU (2000)
Abstract
Bone marrow resident hematopoietic stem cells differentiate into all different types of lymphoid populations, there among mature naive B cells expressing IgM and IgD. During the maturation, the B cells are subjected to several steps of selection to ensure proper development of the antigen receptor. The mechanisms regulating the selection are to great extent unknown. In paper I of this thesis, we demonstrate the presence of the Fas system in late stages of B lymphopoiesis and further discuss the implication of these findings.



In paper II, we investigated the molecular events accompanying the apoptotic process observed in pre-B cells following cross-linking of MHC class I. We were able to show that the apoptotic process... (More)
Bone marrow resident hematopoietic stem cells differentiate into all different types of lymphoid populations, there among mature naive B cells expressing IgM and IgD. During the maturation, the B cells are subjected to several steps of selection to ensure proper development of the antigen receptor. The mechanisms regulating the selection are to great extent unknown. In paper I of this thesis, we demonstrate the presence of the Fas system in late stages of B lymphopoiesis and further discuss the implication of these findings.



In paper II, we investigated the molecular events accompanying the apoptotic process observed in pre-B cells following cross-linking of MHC class I. We were able to show that the apoptotic process was not linked to activation of protein kinase C nor to changes in cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations, intracellular events common in cells undergoing apoptosis. We utilised the differential display technology to detect two genes important in MHC class I mediated apoptosis.



The objective in paper III was to functionally dissect the protein responsible for the infection of bacterial cells by filamentous bacteriophage i.e. the adsorption protein. The improved understanding of the mechanisms behind the infection process could be utilised in the construction of phage display systems used for improved protein expression, as in paper IV, or for studying protein – protein interactions, as in paper V. (Less)
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author
opponent
  • Prof. Uhlén, Mathias, KTH, Stockholm
organization
publishing date
type
Thesis
publication status
published
subject
keywords
B cell development and phage display, transplantation, serology, Immunology, Immunologi, serologi, Biology, Biologi
pages
126 pages
publisher
Department of Immunotechnology, Lund University
defense location
Wallenberglaboratoriet Neurocentrum, Segerfalkssalen
defense date
2000-05-26 10:15
external identifiers
  • other:ISRN: LUTkDH/TKIT--00/1001--SE
ISBN
91-628-4153-X
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
dfeba4c3-0b57-4e28-b48e-d83fb23dc513 (old id 40629)
date added to LUP
2007-07-31 16:39:14
date last changed
2016-09-19 08:45:12
@phdthesis{dfeba4c3-0b57-4e28-b48e-d83fb23dc513,
  abstract     = {Bone marrow resident hematopoietic stem cells differentiate into all different types of lymphoid populations, there among mature naive B cells expressing IgM and IgD. During the maturation, the B cells are subjected to several steps of selection to ensure proper development of the antigen receptor. The mechanisms regulating the selection are to great extent unknown. In paper I of this thesis, we demonstrate the presence of the Fas system in late stages of B lymphopoiesis and further discuss the implication of these findings.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
In paper II, we investigated the molecular events accompanying the apoptotic process observed in pre-B cells following cross-linking of MHC class I. We were able to show that the apoptotic process was not linked to activation of protein kinase C nor to changes in cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations, intracellular events common in cells undergoing apoptosis. We utilised the differential display technology to detect two genes important in MHC class I mediated apoptosis.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
The objective in paper III was to functionally dissect the protein responsible for the infection of bacterial cells by filamentous bacteriophage i.e. the adsorption protein. The improved understanding of the mechanisms behind the infection process could be utilised in the construction of phage display systems used for improved protein expression, as in paper IV, or for studying protein – protein interactions, as in paper V.},
  author       = {Nilsson, Nina},
  isbn         = {91-628-4153-X},
  keyword      = {B cell development and phage display,transplantation,serology,Immunology,Immunologi,serologi,Biology,Biologi},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {126},
  publisher    = {Department of Immunotechnology, Lund University},
  school       = {Lund University},
  title        = {In vivo and in vitro evolution of molecular mechanisms - Importance in B cell development and phage display},
  year         = {2000},
}