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Clinical applications of newer radionuclide therapies

Brans, B ; Lindén, Ola LU ; Giammarile, F ; Tennvall, Jan LU and Punt, C (2006) In European Journal of Cancer 42(8). p.994-1003
Abstract
When radio-iodine was first used in the treatment of metastasized thyroid carcinoma in 1943, its success in terms of tumour response, quality of life improvement and survival was considered a 'miracle', as in those days metastatic cancer was generally fatal. Inspired by this, many efforts have been made to apply radioisotope therapy to other tumours. Radionuclide therapy uses radioactive isotopes labelled with specific targeting agents that aim to deliver the irradiation of the isotope to the tumour, while sparing normal tissues. Its unique modality allows to systemically target radiosensitive tumours throughout the body. Another important principle is its so-called 'cross-fire' action, whereby, owing to the larger reach of the radiation... (More)
When radio-iodine was first used in the treatment of metastasized thyroid carcinoma in 1943, its success in terms of tumour response, quality of life improvement and survival was considered a 'miracle', as in those days metastatic cancer was generally fatal. Inspired by this, many efforts have been made to apply radioisotope therapy to other tumours. Radionuclide therapy uses radioactive isotopes labelled with specific targeting agents that aim to deliver the irradiation of the isotope to the tumour, while sparing normal tissues. Its unique modality allows to systemically target radiosensitive tumours throughout the body. Another important principle is its so-called 'cross-fire' action, whereby, owing to the larger reach of the radiation in relation to the cell diameter, a tumour cell receives lethal hits also from isotopes in the neighbourhood that are not directly associated with this cell. The treatment is therefore less hampered by inhomogeneous distribution and metabolism than for example chemo- or immunotherapy. The European Association of Nuclear Medicine has issued guidelines on so-called 'established' therapies (www.eanm.org), i.e. hyperthyroidism, thyroid carcinoma, refractory synovitis, bone metastases, mIBG therapy, (32)p therapy and Lipiodol therapy. Newer therapies include radio-peptide therapy, radio-immunotherapy of lymphoma and microsphere therapy for liver cancer. The aim of a recently held workshop at the ECCO13 conference 2005 and this review is to inform the oncology community about these new developing therapies. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
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organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Lipiodol, SIR-spheres, anti-CD20, radioimmunotherapy, octreotide, radionuclide therapy, mIBG
in
European Journal of Cancer
volume
42
issue
8
pages
994 - 1003
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:16564689
  • wos:000238208900009
  • scopus:33646396747
ISSN
1879-0852
DOI
10.1016/j.ejca.2005.12.020
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
874b202e-36e6-4f17-b7e5-5b3b50616467 (old id 406854)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 12:00:45
date last changed
2020-08-19 03:15:06
@article{874b202e-36e6-4f17-b7e5-5b3b50616467,
  abstract     = {When radio-iodine was first used in the treatment of metastasized thyroid carcinoma in 1943, its success in terms of tumour response, quality of life improvement and survival was considered a 'miracle', as in those days metastatic cancer was generally fatal. Inspired by this, many efforts have been made to apply radioisotope therapy to other tumours. Radionuclide therapy uses radioactive isotopes labelled with specific targeting agents that aim to deliver the irradiation of the isotope to the tumour, while sparing normal tissues. Its unique modality allows to systemically target radiosensitive tumours throughout the body. Another important principle is its so-called 'cross-fire' action, whereby, owing to the larger reach of the radiation in relation to the cell diameter, a tumour cell receives lethal hits also from isotopes in the neighbourhood that are not directly associated with this cell. The treatment is therefore less hampered by inhomogeneous distribution and metabolism than for example chemo- or immunotherapy. The European Association of Nuclear Medicine has issued guidelines on so-called 'established' therapies (www.eanm.org), i.e. hyperthyroidism, thyroid carcinoma, refractory synovitis, bone metastases, mIBG therapy, (32)p therapy and Lipiodol therapy. Newer therapies include radio-peptide therapy, radio-immunotherapy of lymphoma and microsphere therapy for liver cancer. The aim of a recently held workshop at the ECCO13 conference 2005 and this review is to inform the oncology community about these new developing therapies. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Brans, B and Lindén, Ola and Giammarile, F and Tennvall, Jan and Punt, C},
  issn         = {1879-0852},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {994--1003},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {European Journal of Cancer},
  title        = {Clinical applications of newer radionuclide therapies},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejca.2005.12.020},
  doi          = {10.1016/j.ejca.2005.12.020},
  volume       = {42},
  year         = {2006},
}