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The academic web profile as a genre of ‘self-making’

Francke, Helena LU (2019) In Online Information Review 43(5). p.760-774
Abstract
Purpose

The activities of academic researchers are increasingly regulated by neo-liberal ideals, including expectations that researchers are visible online and actively promote their output. The purpose of this paper is to explore how researchers take on this responsibility. It uses the concepts of genre, authorship and self-writing in order to understand how the story of an academic life is constructed on academic web profiles.
Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative content analysis was conducted of material on 64 profiles belonging to 20 researchers on institutional and personal websites, as well as on ResearchGate, Academica.edu and Google Scholar.
Findings

The study shows that while institutional... (More)
Purpose

The activities of academic researchers are increasingly regulated by neo-liberal ideals, including expectations that researchers are visible online and actively promote their output. The purpose of this paper is to explore how researchers take on this responsibility. It uses the concepts of genre, authorship and self-writing in order to understand how the story of an academic life is constructed on academic web profiles.
Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative content analysis was conducted of material on 64 profiles belonging to 20 researchers on institutional and personal websites, as well as on ResearchGate, Academica.edu and Google Scholar.
Findings

The study shows that while institutional websites primarily contain researcher-produced material, content on commercial platforms is often co-constructed through distributed authorship by the researcher, the platform and other platform users. Nine different ways in which the profile of an “academic self” may be said to highlight the particular strengths of a researcher are identified. These include both metrics-based strengths and qualitative forms of information about the academic life, such as experience, the importance of their research and good teaching.
Social implications

This study of academic web profiles contributes to a better understanding of how researchers self-govern the story of their academic self, or resist such governance, in online environments.
Originality/value

The study furthers the knowledge of how researchers make use of and respond to digital tools for online visibility opportunities and how the story of the “academic self” is “made” for such public presentation. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Academic social network sites, Researchers, Self-writing, Distributed authorship, Academic web profiles
in
Online Information Review
volume
43
issue
5
pages
760 - 774
publisher
Emerald Group Publishing Limited
external identifiers
  • scopus:85063902392
ISSN
1468-4527
DOI
10.1108/OIR-12-2017-0347
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
40f1dcb8-592a-44a8-9b33-b2588cd63ca6
date added to LUP
2018-03-23 16:39:15
date last changed
2019-09-23 16:14:19
@article{40f1dcb8-592a-44a8-9b33-b2588cd63ca6,
  abstract     = {Purpose<br/><br/>The activities of academic researchers are increasingly regulated by neo-liberal ideals, including expectations that researchers are visible online and actively promote their output. The purpose of this paper is to explore how researchers take on this responsibility. It uses the concepts of genre, authorship and self-writing in order to understand how the story of an academic life is constructed on academic web profiles.<br/>Design/methodology/approach<br/><br/>A qualitative content analysis was conducted of material on 64 profiles belonging to 20 researchers on institutional and personal websites, as well as on ResearchGate, Academica.edu and Google Scholar.<br/>Findings<br/><br/>The study shows that while institutional websites primarily contain researcher-produced material, content on commercial platforms is often co-constructed through distributed authorship by the researcher, the platform and other platform users. Nine different ways in which the profile of an “academic self” may be said to highlight the particular strengths of a researcher are identified. These include both metrics-based strengths and qualitative forms of information about the academic life, such as experience, the importance of their research and good teaching.<br/>Social implications<br/><br/>This study of academic web profiles contributes to a better understanding of how researchers self-govern the story of their academic self, or resist such governance, in online environments.<br/>Originality/value<br/><br/>The study furthers the knowledge of how researchers make use of and respond to digital tools for online visibility opportunities and how the story of the “academic self” is “made” for such public presentation.},
  author       = {Francke, Helena},
  issn         = {1468-4527},
  keyword      = {Academic social network sites,Researchers,Self-writing,Distributed authorship,Academic web profiles},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {760--774},
  publisher    = {Emerald Group Publishing Limited},
  series       = {Online Information Review},
  title        = {The academic web profile as a genre of ‘self-making’},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/OIR-12-2017-0347},
  volume       = {43},
  year         = {2019},
}