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A Multicellular Basis for the Origination of Blast Crisis in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

Sachs, Rainer; Johnsson, Kerstin LU ; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Luo, Janet; Chen, Allen and Hlatky, Lynn (2011) In Cancer Research 71(8). p.2838-2847
Abstract
Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is characterized by a specific chromosome translocation, and its pathobiology is considered comparatively well understood. Thus, quantitative analysis of CML and its progression to blast crisis may help elucidate general mechanisms of carcinogenesis and cancer progression. Hitherto, it has been widely postulated that CML blast crisis originates mainly via cell-autonomous mechanisms such as secondary mutations or genomic instability. However, recent results suggest that carcinogenic transformation may be an inherently multicellular event, in departure from the classic unicellular paradigm. We investigate this possibility in the case of blast crisis origination in CML. A quantitative, mechanistic cell... (More)
Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is characterized by a specific chromosome translocation, and its pathobiology is considered comparatively well understood. Thus, quantitative analysis of CML and its progression to blast crisis may help elucidate general mechanisms of carcinogenesis and cancer progression. Hitherto, it has been widely postulated that CML blast crisis originates mainly via cell-autonomous mechanisms such as secondary mutations or genomic instability. However, recent results suggest that carcinogenic transformation may be an inherently multicellular event, in departure from the classic unicellular paradigm. We investigate this possibility in the case of blast crisis origination in CML. A quantitative, mechanistic cell population dynamics model was employed. This model used recent data on imatinib-treated CML; it also used earlier clinical data, not previously incorporated into current mathematical CML/imatinib models. With the pre-imatinib data, which include results on many more blast crises, we obtained evidence that the driving mechanism for blast crisis origination is a cooperation between specific cell types. Assuming leukemic–normal interactions resulted in a statistically significant improvement over assuming either cell-autonomous mechanisms or interactions between leukemic cells. This conclusion was robust with regard to changes in the model's adjustable parameters. Application of the results to patients treated with imatinib suggests that imatinib may act not only on malignant blast precursors, but also, to a limited degree, on the malignant blasts themselves (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Chronic myeloid leukemia, differential equations, blast crisis, mathematical modeling
in
Cancer Research
volume
71
issue
8
pages
2838 - 2847
publisher
American Association for Cancer Research Inc.
external identifiers
  • scopus:79954570748
ISSN
1538-7445
DOI
10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-10-4600
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
bda5f3e0-3111-4f4e-a8a5-998ce67730a9 (old id 4123976)
date added to LUP
2013-10-25 08:33:11
date last changed
2017-09-24 04:08:33
@article{bda5f3e0-3111-4f4e-a8a5-998ce67730a9,
  abstract     = {Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is characterized by a specific chromosome translocation, and its pathobiology is considered comparatively well understood. Thus, quantitative analysis of CML and its progression to blast crisis may help elucidate general mechanisms of carcinogenesis and cancer progression. Hitherto, it has been widely postulated that CML blast crisis originates mainly via cell-autonomous mechanisms such as secondary mutations or genomic instability. However, recent results suggest that carcinogenic transformation may be an inherently multicellular event, in departure from the classic unicellular paradigm. We investigate this possibility in the case of blast crisis origination in CML. A quantitative, mechanistic cell population dynamics model was employed. This model used recent data on imatinib-treated CML; it also used earlier clinical data, not previously incorporated into current mathematical CML/imatinib models. With the pre-imatinib data, which include results on many more blast crises, we obtained evidence that the driving mechanism for blast crisis origination is a cooperation between specific cell types. Assuming leukemic–normal interactions resulted in a statistically significant improvement over assuming either cell-autonomous mechanisms or interactions between leukemic cells. This conclusion was robust with regard to changes in the model's adjustable parameters. Application of the results to patients treated with imatinib suggests that imatinib may act not only on malignant blast precursors, but also, to a limited degree, on the malignant blasts themselves},
  author       = {Sachs, Rainer and Johnsson, Kerstin and Hahnfeldt, Philip and Luo, Janet and Chen, Allen and Hlatky, Lynn},
  issn         = {1538-7445},
  keyword      = {Chronic myeloid leukemia,differential equations,blast crisis,mathematical modeling},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {2838--2847},
  publisher    = {American Association for Cancer Research Inc.},
  series       = {Cancer Research},
  title        = {A Multicellular Basis for the Origination of Blast Crisis in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-10-4600},
  volume       = {71},
  year         = {2011},
}