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Incidence, aetiology and mortality rate of acute pancreatitis over 10 years in a defined urban population in Sweden

Appelros, Stefan LU and Borgström, Anders LU (1999) In British Journal of Surgery 86(4). p.465-470
Abstract
BACKGROUND:



There is a wide range (5-50 per 100 000) in the reported annual incidence of acute pancreatitis. Furthermore, the predominant aetiology varies in different reports. This study was undertaken to establish the current incidence, aetiology and associated mortality rate in a defined population.



METHODS:



A retrospective study of all cases of acute pancreatitis admitted over a 10-year period to a single institution was performed. In addition the autopsy and forensic materials were reviewed.



RESULTS:



Altogether 883 attacks of acute pancreatitis were recorded, of which 547 were first attacks. The annual incidence of first attacks was 23.4... (More)
BACKGROUND:



There is a wide range (5-50 per 100 000) in the reported annual incidence of acute pancreatitis. Furthermore, the predominant aetiology varies in different reports. This study was undertaken to establish the current incidence, aetiology and associated mortality rate in a defined population.



METHODS:



A retrospective study of all cases of acute pancreatitis admitted over a 10-year period to a single institution was performed. In addition the autopsy and forensic materials were reviewed.



RESULTS:



Altogether 883 attacks of acute pancreatitis were recorded, of which 547 were first attacks. The annual incidence of first attacks was 23.4 per 100 000. Including relapses, the incidence was 38.2 per 100 000. Biliary disease was the main aetiological factor in first attacks whereas alcohol was the predominant factor when relapses were included. The mean annual mortality rate for acute pancreatitis in the population was 1.3 per 100 000. Of 31 patients who died from acute pancreatitis only 15 were diagnosed before death. For recurrent disease the mortality rate was 0.3 per cent. In 12 patients the pancreatitis was associated with pancreatic carcinoma.



CONCLUSION:



It is important to differentiate between first attacks and relapses, since both incidence and aetiology figures are influenced by this, and it is important to include autopsy and forensic material in population-based mortality studies. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
British Journal of Surgery
volume
86
issue
4
pages
465 - 470
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • scopus:0032963092
ISSN
1365-2168
DOI
10.1046/j.1365-2168.1999.01049.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2ed04fd6-1f31-40c8-aa1d-d3997c1dc4e9 (old id 4139588)
date added to LUP
2016-01-22 12:43:17
date last changed
2017-07-30 03:35:12
@article{2ed04fd6-1f31-40c8-aa1d-d3997c1dc4e9,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: <br/><br>
<br/><br>
There is a wide range (5-50 per 100 000) in the reported annual incidence of acute pancreatitis. Furthermore, the predominant aetiology varies in different reports. This study was undertaken to establish the current incidence, aetiology and associated mortality rate in a defined population.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
METHODS: <br/><br>
<br/><br>
A retrospective study of all cases of acute pancreatitis admitted over a 10-year period to a single institution was performed. In addition the autopsy and forensic materials were reviewed.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
RESULTS: <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Altogether 883 attacks of acute pancreatitis were recorded, of which 547 were first attacks. The annual incidence of first attacks was 23.4 per 100 000. Including relapses, the incidence was 38.2 per 100 000. Biliary disease was the main aetiological factor in first attacks whereas alcohol was the predominant factor when relapses were included. The mean annual mortality rate for acute pancreatitis in the population was 1.3 per 100 000. Of 31 patients who died from acute pancreatitis only 15 were diagnosed before death. For recurrent disease the mortality rate was 0.3 per cent. In 12 patients the pancreatitis was associated with pancreatic carcinoma.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
CONCLUSION: <br/><br>
<br/><br>
It is important to differentiate between first attacks and relapses, since both incidence and aetiology figures are influenced by this, and it is important to include autopsy and forensic material in population-based mortality studies.},
  author       = {Appelros, Stefan and Borgström, Anders},
  issn         = {1365-2168},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {465--470},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {British Journal of Surgery},
  title        = {Incidence, aetiology and mortality rate of acute pancreatitis over 10 years in a defined urban population in Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2168.1999.01049.x},
  volume       = {86},
  year         = {1999},
}