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Short and long term outcome of severe acute pancreatitis.

Appelros, Stefan LU ; Lindgren, Stefan LU and Borgström, Anders LU (2001) In European Journal of Surgery 167(4). p.281-286
Abstract
OBJECTIVE:



Between 1985 and 1994, 883 cases of acute pancreatitis were treated in Malmö, Sweden (population 233,000). The purpose of this study was to report the short- and long-term outcome of the 79 cases that were severe, according to the Atlanta classification.



DESIGN:



Retrospective and follow-up study a median time of 7 years since the attack.



SETTING:



University hospital, Sweden.



SUBJECTS:



79 patients with severe acute pancreatitis.



MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:



Mortality, cause of death, organ failure, local complications, surgical procedures, mortality since the... (More)
OBJECTIVE:



Between 1985 and 1994, 883 cases of acute pancreatitis were treated in Malmö, Sweden (population 233,000). The purpose of this study was to report the short- and long-term outcome of the 79 cases that were severe, according to the Atlanta classification.



DESIGN:



Retrospective and follow-up study a median time of 7 years since the attack.



SETTING:



University hospital, Sweden.



SUBJECTS:



79 patients with severe acute pancreatitis.



MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:



Mortality, cause of death, organ failure, local complications, surgical procedures, mortality since the attack, and endocrine and exocrine dysfunction.



RESULTS:



Twenty-one patients died from their attack. Organ failure was the predominant cause of death in the 13 patients who died during the first 10 days after admission, whereas infection was the most common cause of death in patients who died later. Mortality was low under the age of 60 and increased with age. Organ failure developed in 72 patients. Twenty-four patients developed pancreatic necrosis or abscesses and 18 patients were treated by necrosectomy and open or closed drainage. At follow-up, 13 patients had died, 2 from pancreatic carcinoma. 35 patients were included in the follow-up survey. 15 of these had diabetes and an additional 4 had impaired glucose tolerance. 9 patients had signs of severe exocrine dysfunction.



CONCLUSIONS:



There was a high incidence of endocrine and exocrine dysfunction together with, in many patients, ongoing social problems related to chronic alcoholism several years after an attack of severe acute pancreatitis. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
European Journal of Surgery
volume
167
issue
4
pages
281 - 286
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:0035053985
ISSN
1102-4151
DOI
10.1080/110241501300091462
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8939ce8f-da80-47ea-9fa4-c3c8d44cd4c5 (old id 4139604)
alternative location
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1080/110241501300091462/abstract
date added to LUP
2016-01-19 16:00:15
date last changed
2018-01-07 09:05:02
@article{8939ce8f-da80-47ea-9fa4-c3c8d44cd4c5,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Between 1985 and 1994, 883 cases of acute pancreatitis were treated in Malmö, Sweden (population 233,000). The purpose of this study was to report the short- and long-term outcome of the 79 cases that were severe, according to the Atlanta classification.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
DESIGN: <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Retrospective and follow-up study a median time of 7 years since the attack.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
SETTING: <br/><br>
<br/><br>
University hospital, Sweden.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
SUBJECTS: <br/><br>
<br/><br>
79 patients with severe acute pancreatitis.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Mortality, cause of death, organ failure, local complications, surgical procedures, mortality since the attack, and endocrine and exocrine dysfunction.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
RESULTS: <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Twenty-one patients died from their attack. Organ failure was the predominant cause of death in the 13 patients who died during the first 10 days after admission, whereas infection was the most common cause of death in patients who died later. Mortality was low under the age of 60 and increased with age. Organ failure developed in 72 patients. Twenty-four patients developed pancreatic necrosis or abscesses and 18 patients were treated by necrosectomy and open or closed drainage. At follow-up, 13 patients had died, 2 from pancreatic carcinoma. 35 patients were included in the follow-up survey. 15 of these had diabetes and an additional 4 had impaired glucose tolerance. 9 patients had signs of severe exocrine dysfunction.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
CONCLUSIONS: <br/><br>
<br/><br>
There was a high incidence of endocrine and exocrine dysfunction together with, in many patients, ongoing social problems related to chronic alcoholism several years after an attack of severe acute pancreatitis.},
  author       = {Appelros, Stefan and Lindgren, Stefan and Borgström, Anders},
  issn         = {1102-4151},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {281--286},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {European Journal of Surgery},
  title        = {Short and long term outcome of severe acute pancreatitis.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/110241501300091462},
  volume       = {167},
  year         = {2001},
}