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Factors affecting time to pregnancy

Axmon, Anna LU orcid ; Rylander, Lars LU orcid ; Albin, Maria LU and Hagmar, L (2006) In Human Reproduction 21(5). p.1279-1284
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Both lifestyle factors and occupational and environmental factors have been suggested to affect the female reproductive system. In the present study, the separate and joint effects of several such factors are investigated. METHODS: Information on time to pregnancy (TTP) was available for 1578 women randomly selected from the general Swedish population. The information was collected retrospectively by using self-administered questionnaires. By means of logistic regression of survival data, fecundability odds ratios were determined for many factors. Multivariate models were used to determine which factors had the most impact on TTP. RESULTS: Several lifestyle factors were found to associate with TTP. However, only use of oral... (More)
BACKGROUND: Both lifestyle factors and occupational and environmental factors have been suggested to affect the female reproductive system. In the present study, the separate and joint effects of several such factors are investigated. METHODS: Information on time to pregnancy (TTP) was available for 1578 women randomly selected from the general Swedish population. The information was collected retrospectively by using self-administered questionnaires. By means of logistic regression of survival data, fecundability odds ratios were determined for many factors. Multivariate models were used to determine which factors had the most impact on TTP. RESULTS: Several lifestyle factors were found to associate with TTP. However, only use of oral contraceptives prior to attempting to conceive, menstrual cycle length, age at conception and parity remained in the multivariate models. Together, these factors explained 14% of the variance in TTP. Excluding first and second month conceptions, only age at conception and menstrual cycle length remained in the multivariate models, together explaining only 8% of the variance in TTP. CONCLUSIONS: Although information on several factors was available, the multivariate model explained only a small fraction of the variation in the observed time to pregnancies. Furthermore, female biological factors seemed more important predictors of TTP than lifestyle factors. (Less)
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author
; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
infertility, lifestyle factors, fertility, occupational exposure
in
Human Reproduction
volume
21
issue
5
pages
1279 - 1284
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000236818600028
  • pmid:16410331
  • scopus:33644822198
ISSN
0268-1161
DOI
10.1093/humrep/dei469
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
978584b9-8955-4959-8262-81fa52ea9f30 (old id 414080)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 12:28:04
date last changed
2020-12-22 03:24:18
@article{978584b9-8955-4959-8262-81fa52ea9f30,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: Both lifestyle factors and occupational and environmental factors have been suggested to affect the female reproductive system. In the present study, the separate and joint effects of several such factors are investigated. METHODS: Information on time to pregnancy (TTP) was available for 1578 women randomly selected from the general Swedish population. The information was collected retrospectively by using self-administered questionnaires. By means of logistic regression of survival data, fecundability odds ratios were determined for many factors. Multivariate models were used to determine which factors had the most impact on TTP. RESULTS: Several lifestyle factors were found to associate with TTP. However, only use of oral contraceptives prior to attempting to conceive, menstrual cycle length, age at conception and parity remained in the multivariate models. Together, these factors explained 14% of the variance in TTP. Excluding first and second month conceptions, only age at conception and menstrual cycle length remained in the multivariate models, together explaining only 8% of the variance in TTP. CONCLUSIONS: Although information on several factors was available, the multivariate model explained only a small fraction of the variation in the observed time to pregnancies. Furthermore, female biological factors seemed more important predictors of TTP than lifestyle factors.},
  author       = {Axmon, Anna and Rylander, Lars and Albin, Maria and Hagmar, L},
  issn         = {0268-1161},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {1279--1284},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Human Reproduction},
  title        = {Factors affecting time to pregnancy},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/humrep/dei469},
  doi          = {10.1093/humrep/dei469},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2006},
}