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Gaseous hexane biodegradation by Fusarium solani in two liquid phase packed-bed and stirred-tank bioreactors

Arriaga, S ; Munoz, Raul LU ; Hernandez, S ; Guieysse, Benoit LU and Revah, S (2006) In Environmental Science & Technology 40(7). p.2390-2395
Abstract
Biofiltration of hydrophobic volatile pollutants is intrinsically limited by poor transfer of the pollutants from the gaseous to the liquid biotic phase, where biodegradation occurs. This study was conducted to evaluate the potential of silicone oil for enhancing the transport and subsequent biodegradation of hexane by the fungus Fusarium solani in various bioreactor configurations. Silicone oil was first selected among various solvents for its biocompatibility, nonbiodegradability, and good partitioning properties toward hexane. In batch tests, the use of silicone oil improved hexane specific biodegradation by approximately 60%. Subsequent biodegradation experiments were conducted in stirred-tank (1.5 L) and packed-bed (2.5 L) bioreactors... (More)
Biofiltration of hydrophobic volatile pollutants is intrinsically limited by poor transfer of the pollutants from the gaseous to the liquid biotic phase, where biodegradation occurs. This study was conducted to evaluate the potential of silicone oil for enhancing the transport and subsequent biodegradation of hexane by the fungus Fusarium solani in various bioreactor configurations. Silicone oil was first selected among various solvents for its biocompatibility, nonbiodegradability, and good partitioning properties toward hexane. In batch tests, the use of silicone oil improved hexane specific biodegradation by approximately 60%. Subsequent biodegradation experiments were conducted in stirred-tank (1.5 L) and packed-bed (2.5 L) bioreactors fed with a constant gaseous hexane load of 180 g center dot m(reactor)(-3)center dot h(-1) and operated for 12 and 40 days, respectively. In the stirred reactors, the maximum hexane elimination capacity (EC) increased from 50 g center dot m(reactor)(-3)center dot h(-1) (removal efficiency, RE of 28%) in the control not supplied with silicone oil to 120 g center dot m(reactor)(-3)center dot h(-1) in the biphasic system (67% RE). In the packed-bed bioreactors, the maximum EC ranged from 110 (50% RE) to 180 g center dot m(reactor)(-3)center dot h(-1) (>90% RE) in the control and two-liquid-phase systems, respectively. These results represent, to the best of our knowledge, the first reported case of fungi use in a two-liquid-phase bioreactor and the highest hexane removal capacities so far reported in biofilters. (Less)
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author
; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Environmental Science & Technology
volume
40
issue
7
pages
2390 - 2395
publisher
The American Chemical Society (ACS)
external identifiers
  • wos:000236691600059
  • pmid:16646479
  • scopus:33645782779
ISSN
1520-5851
DOI
10.1021/es051512m
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f0efcdb7-8f27-4673-bea2-7402e4cf83a6 (old id 414112)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 17:01:20
date last changed
2021-02-17 07:53:24
@article{f0efcdb7-8f27-4673-bea2-7402e4cf83a6,
  abstract     = {Biofiltration of hydrophobic volatile pollutants is intrinsically limited by poor transfer of the pollutants from the gaseous to the liquid biotic phase, where biodegradation occurs. This study was conducted to evaluate the potential of silicone oil for enhancing the transport and subsequent biodegradation of hexane by the fungus Fusarium solani in various bioreactor configurations. Silicone oil was first selected among various solvents for its biocompatibility, nonbiodegradability, and good partitioning properties toward hexane. In batch tests, the use of silicone oil improved hexane specific biodegradation by approximately 60%. Subsequent biodegradation experiments were conducted in stirred-tank (1.5 L) and packed-bed (2.5 L) bioreactors fed with a constant gaseous hexane load of 180 g center dot m(reactor)(-3)center dot h(-1) and operated for 12 and 40 days, respectively. In the stirred reactors, the maximum hexane elimination capacity (EC) increased from 50 g center dot m(reactor)(-3)center dot h(-1) (removal efficiency, RE of 28%) in the control not supplied with silicone oil to 120 g center dot m(reactor)(-3)center dot h(-1) in the biphasic system (67% RE). In the packed-bed bioreactors, the maximum EC ranged from 110 (50% RE) to 180 g center dot m(reactor)(-3)center dot h(-1) (>90% RE) in the control and two-liquid-phase systems, respectively. These results represent, to the best of our knowledge, the first reported case of fungi use in a two-liquid-phase bioreactor and the highest hexane removal capacities so far reported in biofilters.},
  author       = {Arriaga, S and Munoz, Raul and Hernandez, S and Guieysse, Benoit and Revah, S},
  issn         = {1520-5851},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {2390--2395},
  publisher    = {The American Chemical Society (ACS)},
  series       = {Environmental Science & Technology},
  title        = {Gaseous hexane biodegradation by Fusarium solani in two liquid phase packed-bed and stirred-tank bioreactors},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es051512m},
  doi          = {10.1021/es051512m},
  volume       = {40},
  year         = {2006},
}