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Friendship network characteristics and psychological well-being in late adolescence: Exploring differences by gender and gender composition

Almquist, Ylva B; Östberg, Viveca; Rostila, Mikael; Edling, Christofer LU and Rydgren, Jens (2014) In Scandinavian Journal of Public Health 42(2). p.146-154
Abstract
Aims: The aim of the present study was to examine the association between friendship networks and psychological well-being among 19-year-olds. Methods: The data used was a random sample of Swedish individuals born in 1990 who answered a questionnaire in 2009–2010. Friendship networks were considered in terms of three measures of emotional support. Six statements about the individual’s emotional state were used to create a summary measure of psychological well-being. Gender and gender composition were included as potentially moderating factors. The association between friendship networks and psychological well-being was analysed by means of linear regression analysis (n = 1289). Results: The results indicate that males’ and females’... (More)
Aims: The aim of the present study was to examine the association between friendship networks and psychological well-being among 19-year-olds. Methods: The data used was a random sample of Swedish individuals born in 1990 who answered a questionnaire in 2009–2010. Friendship networks were considered in terms of three measures of emotional support. Six statements about the individual’s emotional state were used to create a summary measure of psychological well-being. Gender and gender composition were included as potentially moderating factors. The association between friendship networks and psychological well-being was analysed by means of linear regression analysis (n = 1289). Results: The results indicate that males’ and females’ friendship networks were similar with regard to quality and trust, whereas males’ networks were characterized by less self-disclosure and a stronger preference for same-gender friendships. Gender composition did not matter for the support levels. Emotional support was associated with psychological well-being but there were gender differences: females seemed to benefit more health-wise from having high-quality (and trusting) networks. Moreover, whereas self-disclosure among males was positively linked to well-being, this was not the case among females. None of these associations were moderated by gender composition. Conclusions: In sum, friendship networks are beneficial for the psychological well-being among late adolescents, but there are some important differences according to gender. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Emotional support, friendship, gender differences, late adolescence, psychological well-being, social networks
in
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
volume
42
issue
2
pages
146 - 154
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000331371600005
  • scopus:84894493998
ISSN
1651-1905
DOI
10.1177/1403494813510793
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b678cf3d-1bca-4182-a055-d88f1a35c687 (old id 4173031)
date added to LUP
2013-11-20 14:12:13
date last changed
2017-11-19 03:21:21
@article{b678cf3d-1bca-4182-a055-d88f1a35c687,
  abstract     = {Aims: The aim of the present study was to examine the association between friendship networks and psychological well-being among 19-year-olds. Methods: The data used was a random sample of Swedish individuals born in 1990 who answered a questionnaire in 2009–2010. Friendship networks were considered in terms of three measures of emotional support. Six statements about the individual’s emotional state were used to create a summary measure of psychological well-being. Gender and gender composition were included as potentially moderating factors. The association between friendship networks and psychological well-being was analysed by means of linear regression analysis (n = 1289). Results: The results indicate that males’ and females’ friendship networks were similar with regard to quality and trust, whereas males’ networks were characterized by less self-disclosure and a stronger preference for same-gender friendships. Gender composition did not matter for the support levels. Emotional support was associated with psychological well-being but there were gender differences: females seemed to benefit more health-wise from having high-quality (and trusting) networks. Moreover, whereas self-disclosure among males was positively linked to well-being, this was not the case among females. None of these associations were moderated by gender composition. Conclusions: In sum, friendship networks are beneficial for the psychological well-being among late adolescents, but there are some important differences according to gender.},
  author       = {Almquist, Ylva B and Östberg, Viveca and Rostila, Mikael and Edling, Christofer and Rydgren, Jens},
  issn         = {1651-1905},
  keyword      = {Emotional support,friendship,gender differences,late adolescence,psychological well-being,social networks},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {146--154},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Public Health},
  title        = {Friendship network characteristics and psychological well-being in late adolescence: Exploring differences by gender and gender composition},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1403494813510793},
  volume       = {42},
  year         = {2014},
}