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Weak D type 2 is the most prevalent weak D type in Portugal

Araujo, F ; Rodrigues, MJ ; Monteiro, F ; Chabert, T ; Tavares, G ; Sousa, G ; Storry, Jill LU and Guimaraes, JE (2006) In Transfusion Medicine 16(1). p.63-67
Abstract
The weak D phenotype is the most common D variant, with a frequency of 0.2-1% in Caucasian individuals. There are several weak D types, with different frequencies in European countries, which may pose serologic problems and have the potential for alloimmunization. Samples from Portuguese individuals were tested for RhD by two or three distinct monoclonal and oligoclonal antisera, in direct agglutination tests. When discrepant results were observed, samples were tested with panels of monoclonal anti-D by LISS-indirect antigobulin test. Cases that reacted weakly with IgM but positive with IgG anti-D were analysed by PCR-sequence-specific primers and real-time PCR. Ninety-nine samples were referred after being characterized as weak D. This... (More)
The weak D phenotype is the most common D variant, with a frequency of 0.2-1% in Caucasian individuals. There are several weak D types, with different frequencies in European countries, which may pose serologic problems and have the potential for alloimmunization. Samples from Portuguese individuals were tested for RhD by two or three distinct monoclonal and oligoclonal antisera, in direct agglutination tests. When discrepant results were observed, samples were tested with panels of monoclonal anti-D by LISS-indirect antigobulin test. Cases that reacted weakly with IgM but positive with IgG anti-D were analysed by PCR-sequence-specific primers and real-time PCR. Ninety-nine samples were referred after being characterized as weak D. This genotype was recognized, with a preponderance of weak D type 2 (63.6%) over type 1 (16.2%) and 3 (14.1%). The high incidence of weak D type 2 in our population is in marked contrast to studies performed in other European populations and might be due to our sample selection criteria or ethnic variation. There are advantages in genotyping serologically depressed D samples to avoid the waste of D-negative RBC units and the use of immunoglobulin in pregnant women, who have no risk of alloimmunization. (Less)
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author
; ; ; ; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
alloimmunization, D variants, real-time PCR, weak D
in
Transfusion Medicine
volume
16
issue
1
pages
63 - 67
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000235358700008
  • scopus:33644888809
ISSN
0958-7578
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-3148.2005.00638.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
299b28ad-f1eb-4219-bb6f-5624877e5f35 (old id 417315)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 15:52:40
date last changed
2021-01-06 06:50:38
@article{299b28ad-f1eb-4219-bb6f-5624877e5f35,
  abstract     = {The weak D phenotype is the most common D variant, with a frequency of 0.2-1% in Caucasian individuals. There are several weak D types, with different frequencies in European countries, which may pose serologic problems and have the potential for alloimmunization. Samples from Portuguese individuals were tested for RhD by two or three distinct monoclonal and oligoclonal antisera, in direct agglutination tests. When discrepant results were observed, samples were tested with panels of monoclonal anti-D by LISS-indirect antigobulin test. Cases that reacted weakly with IgM but positive with IgG anti-D were analysed by PCR-sequence-specific primers and real-time PCR. Ninety-nine samples were referred after being characterized as weak D. This genotype was recognized, with a preponderance of weak D type 2 (63.6%) over type 1 (16.2%) and 3 (14.1%). The high incidence of weak D type 2 in our population is in marked contrast to studies performed in other European populations and might be due to our sample selection criteria or ethnic variation. There are advantages in genotyping serologically depressed D samples to avoid the waste of D-negative RBC units and the use of immunoglobulin in pregnant women, who have no risk of alloimmunization.},
  author       = {Araujo, F and Rodrigues, MJ and Monteiro, F and Chabert, T and Tavares, G and Sousa, G and Storry, Jill and Guimaraes, JE},
  issn         = {0958-7578},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {63--67},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Transfusion Medicine},
  title        = {Weak D type 2 is the most prevalent weak D type in Portugal},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3148.2005.00638.x},
  doi          = {10.1111/j.1365-3148.2005.00638.x},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2006},
}