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Bullying at work, health outcomes, and physiological stress response

Hansen, AM ; Hogh, A ; Persson, Roger LU orcid ; Karlson, Björn LU ; Garde, AH and Örbaek, Palle LU (2006) In Journal of Psychosomatic Research 60(1). p.63-72
Abstract
The relationships among bullying or witnessing bullying at work, self-reported health symptoms, and physiological stress reactivity were analysed in a sample of 437 employees (294 women and 143 men). Physiological stress reactivity was measured as cortisol in the saliva. Of the respondents, 5% of the women (n=15) and 5% of the men (n=7) reported bullying, whereas 9% of the women (n=25) and 11% of the men (n=15) had witnessed bullying at work. The results indicated that the bullied respondents had lower social support from coworkers and supervisors, and they reported more symptoms of somatisation, depression, anxiety, and negative affectivity (NA) than did the nonbullied respondents. Witnesses reported more symptoms of anxiety and lower... (More)
The relationships among bullying or witnessing bullying at work, self-reported health symptoms, and physiological stress reactivity were analysed in a sample of 437 employees (294 women and 143 men). Physiological stress reactivity was measured as cortisol in the saliva. Of the respondents, 5% of the women (n=15) and 5% of the men (n=7) reported bullying, whereas 9% of the women (n=25) and 11% of the men (n=15) had witnessed bullying at work. The results indicated that the bullied respondents had lower social support from coworkers and supervisors, and they reported more symptoms of somatisation, depression, anxiety, and negative affectivity (NA) than did the nonbullied respondents. Witnesses reported more symptoms of anxiety and lower support from supervisor than did the nonbullied employees. Concentrations of cortisol in the saliva were lower at awakening in bullied respondents compared with nonbullied respondents. Previous studies have reported lower diurnal concentration of cortisol for people with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and chronic fatigue. To our knowledge, this is the first full study on the associations among being subjected to bullying, health outcomes, and physiological stress response. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
; ; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
physiological stress response, negative affectivity, health symptoms, bullying, witnesses of bullying
in
Journal of Psychosomatic Research
volume
60
issue
1
pages
63 - 72
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000235317900010
  • pmid:16380312
  • scopus:29344435275
  • pmid:16380312
ISSN
1879-1360
DOI
10.1016/j.jpsychores.2005.06.078
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
97afdd5d-1290-4797-bc5f-2083a73d53d5 (old id 417396)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 12:09:50
date last changed
2021-10-03 03:41:23
@article{97afdd5d-1290-4797-bc5f-2083a73d53d5,
  abstract     = {The relationships among bullying or witnessing bullying at work, self-reported health symptoms, and physiological stress reactivity were analysed in a sample of 437 employees (294 women and 143 men). Physiological stress reactivity was measured as cortisol in the saliva. Of the respondents, 5% of the women (n=15) and 5% of the men (n=7) reported bullying, whereas 9% of the women (n=25) and 11% of the men (n=15) had witnessed bullying at work. The results indicated that the bullied respondents had lower social support from coworkers and supervisors, and they reported more symptoms of somatisation, depression, anxiety, and negative affectivity (NA) than did the nonbullied respondents. Witnesses reported more symptoms of anxiety and lower support from supervisor than did the nonbullied employees. Concentrations of cortisol in the saliva were lower at awakening in bullied respondents compared with nonbullied respondents. Previous studies have reported lower diurnal concentration of cortisol for people with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and chronic fatigue. To our knowledge, this is the first full study on the associations among being subjected to bullying, health outcomes, and physiological stress response. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Hansen, AM and Hogh, A and Persson, Roger and Karlson, Björn and Garde, AH and Örbaek, Palle},
  issn         = {1879-1360},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {63--72},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Psychosomatic Research},
  title        = {Bullying at work, health outcomes, and physiological stress response},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychores.2005.06.078},
  doi          = {10.1016/j.jpsychores.2005.06.078},
  volume       = {60},
  year         = {2006},
}