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The impact of glycosylation on HLA-DR1-restricted T cell recognition of type II collagen in a mouse model

von Delwig, A ; Altmann, DM ; Isaacs, JD ; Harding, CV ; Holmdahl, Rikard LU ; McKie, N and Robinson, JH (2006) In Arthritis and Rheumatism 54(2). p.482-491
Abstract
Objective. Type 11 collagen (01) is a candidate autoantigen implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Posttranslational glycosylation of CII could alter intracellular antigen processing, leading to the development of autoimmune T cell responses. To address this possibility, we studied the intracellular processing of CII for presentation of the arthritogenic glycosylated epitope CII259-273 to CD4 T cells in macrophages from HLA-DR1-transgenic mice. Methods. HLA-DR1-transgenic mice were generated on a class II major histocompatibility complex-deficient background, and T cell hybridomas specific for the glycosylated and nonglycosylated epitope CII259-273 were developed. Subcellular fractionation of macrophages was used to... (More)
Objective. Type 11 collagen (01) is a candidate autoantigen implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Posttranslational glycosylation of CII could alter intracellular antigen processing, leading to the development of autoimmune T cell responses. To address this possibility, we studied the intracellular processing of CII for presentation of the arthritogenic glycosylated epitope CII259-273 to CD4 T cells in macrophages from HLA-DR1-transgenic mice. Methods. HLA-DR1-transgenic mice were generated on a class II major histocompatibility complex-deficient background, and T cell hybridomas specific for the glycosylated and nonglycosylated epitope CII259-273 were developed. Subcellular fractionation of macrophages was used to localize CII degradation to particular compartments and to identify the catalytic subtype of proteinases involved. Results. We showed that the glycosylated CII259-273 epitope required more extensive processing than did the nonglycosylated form of the same epitope. Dense fractions containing lysosomes were primarily engaged in the processing of CII for antigen presentation, since these compartments contained 1) enzyme activity that generated antigenic CII fragments bearing the arthritogenic glycosylated epitope, 2) the antigenic CII fragments themselves, 3) CII peptide-receptive HLA-DR1 molecules, and 4) peptide/HLA-DR1 complexes that could directly activate T cell hybridomas. Degradation of CII by dense fractions occurred optimally at pH 4.5 and was abrogated by inhibitors of serine and cysteine proteinases. Conclusion. Processing of the arthritogenic glycosylated CII259-273 epitope, which is implicated in the induction of autoimmune arthritis, is more stringently regulated than is processing of the nonglycosylated form of the same epitope. Mechanisms of intracellular processing of the glycosylated epitope may constitute novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of RA. (Less)
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author
; ; ; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Arthritis and Rheumatism
volume
54
issue
2
pages
482 - 491
publisher
John Wiley and Sons
external identifiers
  • pmid:16447222
  • wos:000235353200012
  • scopus:31144457855
  • pmid:16447222
ISSN
1529-0131
DOI
10.1002/art.21565
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Medical Inflammation Research (013212019)
id
ce9226ec-3220-4e0d-98ba-838ce8016bfe (old id 417622)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 12:06:06
date last changed
2021-02-17 05:46:11
@article{ce9226ec-3220-4e0d-98ba-838ce8016bfe,
  abstract     = {Objective. Type 11 collagen (01) is a candidate autoantigen implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Posttranslational glycosylation of CII could alter intracellular antigen processing, leading to the development of autoimmune T cell responses. To address this possibility, we studied the intracellular processing of CII for presentation of the arthritogenic glycosylated epitope CII259-273 to CD4 T cells in macrophages from HLA-DR1-transgenic mice. Methods. HLA-DR1-transgenic mice were generated on a class II major histocompatibility complex-deficient background, and T cell hybridomas specific for the glycosylated and nonglycosylated epitope CII259-273 were developed. Subcellular fractionation of macrophages was used to localize CII degradation to particular compartments and to identify the catalytic subtype of proteinases involved. Results. We showed that the glycosylated CII259-273 epitope required more extensive processing than did the nonglycosylated form of the same epitope. Dense fractions containing lysosomes were primarily engaged in the processing of CII for antigen presentation, since these compartments contained 1) enzyme activity that generated antigenic CII fragments bearing the arthritogenic glycosylated epitope, 2) the antigenic CII fragments themselves, 3) CII peptide-receptive HLA-DR1 molecules, and 4) peptide/HLA-DR1 complexes that could directly activate T cell hybridomas. Degradation of CII by dense fractions occurred optimally at pH 4.5 and was abrogated by inhibitors of serine and cysteine proteinases. Conclusion. Processing of the arthritogenic glycosylated CII259-273 epitope, which is implicated in the induction of autoimmune arthritis, is more stringently regulated than is processing of the nonglycosylated form of the same epitope. Mechanisms of intracellular processing of the glycosylated epitope may constitute novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of RA.},
  author       = {von Delwig, A and Altmann, DM and Isaacs, JD and Harding, CV and Holmdahl, Rikard and McKie, N and Robinson, JH},
  issn         = {1529-0131},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {482--491},
  publisher    = {John Wiley and Sons},
  series       = {Arthritis and Rheumatism},
  title        = {The impact of glycosylation on HLA-DR1-restricted T cell recognition of type II collagen in a mouse model},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/art.21565},
  doi          = {10.1002/art.21565},
  volume       = {54},
  year         = {2006},
}