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Routinising research : academic skills in analogue and digitial worlds

Löfgren, Orvar LU (2014) In International Journal of Social Research Methodology 17(1). p.73-86
Abstract
This paper explores research routines which are so mundane that they are rarely noticed and may be hard to even verbalise. How does one acquire the bodily dexterity of rifling through a filing cabinet, skimming Google lists, or judging a book by holding in it one’s hands? Drawing on interviews with and observations among scholars of both the analogue and digital generations, mainly in the social and cultural sciences, I look at how such routines are established, naturalised and transformed. They may be seen as methods slowly turning into habits taken for granted. To what extent do such practices, which are often seen as intensely personal, actually mirror norms and cultural conventions of specific academic settings?

With a focus... (More)
This paper explores research routines which are so mundane that they are rarely noticed and may be hard to even verbalise. How does one acquire the bodily dexterity of rifling through a filing cabinet, skimming Google lists, or judging a book by holding in it one’s hands? Drawing on interviews with and observations among scholars of both the analogue and digital generations, mainly in the social and cultural sciences, I look at how such routines are established, naturalised and transformed. They may be seen as methods slowly turning into habits taken for granted. To what extent do such practices, which are often seen as intensely personal, actually mirror norms and cultural conventions of specific academic settings?

With a focus on materialities and sensibilities, I discuss three arenas of everyday academic activities: writing, reading and handling information. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
routines, skills, academic work, analogue, digital.
in
International Journal of Social Research Methodology
volume
17
issue
1
pages
73 - 86
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000328016800006
  • scopus:84890431377
ISSN
1464-5300
DOI
10.1080/13645579.2014.854022
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3dacc294-ca9f-4f78-b4c7-4ec37d1e544a (old id 4247002)
date added to LUP
2014-01-13 14:54:15
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:40:06
@article{3dacc294-ca9f-4f78-b4c7-4ec37d1e544a,
  abstract     = {This paper explores research routines which are so mundane that they are rarely noticed and may be hard to even verbalise. How does one acquire the bodily dexterity of rifling through a filing cabinet, skimming Google lists, or judging a book by holding in it one’s hands? Drawing on interviews with and observations among scholars of both the analogue and digital generations, mainly in the social and cultural sciences, I look at how such routines are established, naturalised and transformed. They may be seen as methods slowly turning into habits taken for granted. To what extent do such practices, which are often seen as intensely personal, actually mirror norms and cultural conventions of specific academic settings? <br/><br>
With a focus on materialities and sensibilities, I discuss three arenas of everyday academic activities: writing, reading and handling information.},
  author       = {Löfgren, Orvar},
  issn         = {1464-5300},
  keyword      = {routines,skills,academic work,analogue,digital.},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {73--86},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {International Journal of Social Research Methodology},
  title        = {Routinising research : academic skills in analogue and digitial worlds},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13645579.2014.854022},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2014},
}