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Full Spectrum of Psychiatric Disorders Related to Foreign Migration A Danish Population-Based Cohort Study

Cantor-Graae, Elizabeth LU and Pedersen, Carsten B. (2013) In JAMA Psychiatry 70(4). p.427-435
Abstract
Importance: Although increased risk for schizophrenia among immigrants is well established, knowledge of the broader spectrum of psychiatric disorders associated with a foreign migration background is lacking. Objective: To examine the full range of psychiatric disorders associated with any type of foreign migration background among persons residing in Denmark, including foreign-born adoptees, first- and second-generation immigrants, native Danes with a history of foreign residence, and persons born abroad to Danish expatriates. Design and Setting: Danish population-based cohort study. Persons were followed up from their 10th birthday for the development of mental disorders based on outpatient and inpatient data. Participants: All persons... (More)
Importance: Although increased risk for schizophrenia among immigrants is well established, knowledge of the broader spectrum of psychiatric disorders associated with a foreign migration background is lacking. Objective: To examine the full range of psychiatric disorders associated with any type of foreign migration background among persons residing in Denmark, including foreign-born adoptees, first- and second-generation immigrants, native Danes with a history of foreign residence, and persons born abroad to Danish expatriates. Design and Setting: Danish population-based cohort study. Persons were followed up from their 10th birthday for the development of mental disorders based on outpatient and inpatient data. Participants: All persons born between January 1, 1971, and December 31, 2000 (N= 1 859 419) residing in Denmark by their 10th birthday with follow-up data to December 31, 2010. Main Outcome Measures: Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and cumulative incidences for psychiatric outcomes. Results: All categories of foreign migration background, except persons born abroad to Danish expatriates, were associated with increased risk for at least 1 psychiatric disorder. Foreign-born adoptees had increased IRRs for all psychiatric disorders and had the highest IRRs for these disorders compared with other foreign migration categories. First-and second-generation immigrants having 2 foreign-born parents had significantly increased IRRs for schizophrenia and schizophrenia spectrum disorders and had similar risk magnitudes. Second- generation immigrants having 1 foreign-born parent had significantly increased IRRs for all psychiatric disorders. Native Danes with a history of foreign residence had increased IRRs for bipolar affective disorder, affective disorders, personality disorders, and schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Conclusions and Relevance: The extent to which a background of foreign migration confers an increased risk for the broad spectrum of psychiatric disorders varies according to parental origin, with greatest risks for foreign-born adoptees. The spectrum of psychiatric disorders showed greater variation within the second-generation immigrant group than between first-generation vs second-generation immigrants, and the spectrum differed according to whether individuals had 1 or 2 foreign-born parents. (Less)
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author
and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
JAMA Psychiatry
volume
70
issue
4
pages
427 - 435
publisher
American Medical Association
external identifiers
  • wos:000320853400009
  • scopus:84876062796
  • pmid:23446644
ISSN
2168-6238
DOI
10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2013.441
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4254e1a1-dc4e-4de5-bf16-4e8ce70de9fe (old id 3979311)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 10:12:31
date last changed
2020-09-30 01:17:23
@article{4254e1a1-dc4e-4de5-bf16-4e8ce70de9fe,
  abstract     = {Importance: Although increased risk for schizophrenia among immigrants is well established, knowledge of the broader spectrum of psychiatric disorders associated with a foreign migration background is lacking. Objective: To examine the full range of psychiatric disorders associated with any type of foreign migration background among persons residing in Denmark, including foreign-born adoptees, first- and second-generation immigrants, native Danes with a history of foreign residence, and persons born abroad to Danish expatriates. Design and Setting: Danish population-based cohort study. Persons were followed up from their 10th birthday for the development of mental disorders based on outpatient and inpatient data. Participants: All persons born between January 1, 1971, and December 31, 2000 (N= 1 859 419) residing in Denmark by their 10th birthday with follow-up data to December 31, 2010. Main Outcome Measures: Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and cumulative incidences for psychiatric outcomes. Results: All categories of foreign migration background, except persons born abroad to Danish expatriates, were associated with increased risk for at least 1 psychiatric disorder. Foreign-born adoptees had increased IRRs for all psychiatric disorders and had the highest IRRs for these disorders compared with other foreign migration categories. First-and second-generation immigrants having 2 foreign-born parents had significantly increased IRRs for schizophrenia and schizophrenia spectrum disorders and had similar risk magnitudes. Second- generation immigrants having 1 foreign-born parent had significantly increased IRRs for all psychiatric disorders. Native Danes with a history of foreign residence had increased IRRs for bipolar affective disorder, affective disorders, personality disorders, and schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Conclusions and Relevance: The extent to which a background of foreign migration confers an increased risk for the broad spectrum of psychiatric disorders varies according to parental origin, with greatest risks for foreign-born adoptees. The spectrum of psychiatric disorders showed greater variation within the second-generation immigrant group than between first-generation vs second-generation immigrants, and the spectrum differed according to whether individuals had 1 or 2 foreign-born parents.},
  author       = {Cantor-Graae, Elizabeth and Pedersen, Carsten B.},
  issn         = {2168-6238},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {427--435},
  publisher    = {American Medical Association},
  series       = {JAMA Psychiatry},
  title        = {Full Spectrum of Psychiatric Disorders Related to Foreign Migration A Danish Population-Based Cohort Study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2013.441},
  doi          = {10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2013.441},
  volume       = {70},
  year         = {2013},
}