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Storm water quality of first flush urban runoff in relation to different traffic characteristics

Czemiel Berndtsson, Justyna LU (2014) In Urban Water Journal 11(4). p.284-296
Abstract
Storm water quality was monitored at four sites in a middle-sized Swedish town. The objective was to compare storm water pollution in the first flush storm water runoff between sites with different traffic intensities within a town. Flow proportional storm water runoff samples were collected. The samples were analyzed for suspended solids, conductivity, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, oil index, lead, cadmium, copper, chromium, nickel, and zinc.The results showed that the levels of heavy metals and total phosphorus in storm water were highest at the site with the highest traffic intensity (7000 vehicles/day). A strong linear dependence between suspended solids (SS) and total phosphorus and heavy metals was observed. SS was the dominant... (More)
Storm water quality was monitored at four sites in a middle-sized Swedish town. The objective was to compare storm water pollution in the first flush storm water runoff between sites with different traffic intensities within a town. Flow proportional storm water runoff samples were collected. The samples were analyzed for suspended solids, conductivity, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, oil index, lead, cadmium, copper, chromium, nickel, and zinc.The results showed that the levels of heavy metals and total phosphorus in storm water were highest at the site with the highest traffic intensity (7000 vehicles/day). A strong linear dependence between suspended solids (SS) and total phosphorus and heavy metals was observed. SS was the dominant explanatory variable for these parameters and a suitable predictor. The observed correlation between SS, heavy metals, and total phosphorus means that reducing levels of suspended solids in storm water would contribute to a substantial decrease of particle-bound heavy metals and total phosphorus in storm water. No samples were taken during winter; however, results indicate that de-icing material used in winter may affect surface runoff quality during other seasons. The results can be used as a reference for storm water quality management for traffic-related sites in towns with similar land use and climatic characteristics. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
first flush, pollution, storm water, surface runoff quality, traffic, volume
in
Urban Water Journal
volume
11
issue
4
pages
284 - 296
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000328465600003
  • scopus:84890787297
ISSN
1744-9006
DOI
10.1080/1573062X.2013.795236
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bda2d86d-2276-4bea-99f1-d7c5d4205875 (old id 4261830)
date added to LUP
2014-02-10 14:55:27
date last changed
2017-09-10 03:03:31
@article{bda2d86d-2276-4bea-99f1-d7c5d4205875,
  abstract     = {Storm water quality was monitored at four sites in a middle-sized Swedish town. The objective was to compare storm water pollution in the first flush storm water runoff between sites with different traffic intensities within a town. Flow proportional storm water runoff samples were collected. The samples were analyzed for suspended solids, conductivity, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, oil index, lead, cadmium, copper, chromium, nickel, and zinc.The results showed that the levels of heavy metals and total phosphorus in storm water were highest at the site with the highest traffic intensity (7000 vehicles/day). A strong linear dependence between suspended solids (SS) and total phosphorus and heavy metals was observed. SS was the dominant explanatory variable for these parameters and a suitable predictor. The observed correlation between SS, heavy metals, and total phosphorus means that reducing levels of suspended solids in storm water would contribute to a substantial decrease of particle-bound heavy metals and total phosphorus in storm water. No samples were taken during winter; however, results indicate that de-icing material used in winter may affect surface runoff quality during other seasons. The results can be used as a reference for storm water quality management for traffic-related sites in towns with similar land use and climatic characteristics.},
  author       = {Czemiel Berndtsson, Justyna},
  issn         = {1744-9006},
  keyword      = {first flush,pollution,storm water,surface runoff quality,traffic,volume},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {284--296},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Urban Water Journal},
  title        = {Storm water quality of first flush urban runoff in relation to different traffic characteristics},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1573062X.2013.795236},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2014},
}