Advanced

mHealth Self-Report Monitoring in Competitive Middle- and Long-Distance Runners : Qualitative Study of Long-Term Use Intentions Using the Technology Acceptance Model

Rönnby, Sara; Lundberg, Oscar; Fagher, Kristina LU ; Jacobsson, Jenny; Tillander, Bo; Gauffin, Håkan; Hansson, Per-Olof; Dahlström, Örjan and Timpka, Toomas (2018) In JMIR mHealth and uHealth 6(8).
Abstract

BACKGROUND: International middle- and long-distance running competitions attract millions of spectators in association with city races, world championships, and Olympic Games. It is therefore a major concern that ill health and pain, as a result of sports overuse, lead to numerous hours of lost training and decreased performance in competitive runners. Despite its potential for sustenance of performance, approval of mHealth self-report monitoring (mHSM) in this group of athletes has not been investigated.

OBJECTIVE: The objective of our study was to explore individual and situational factors associated with the acceptance of long-term mHSM in competitive runners.

METHODS: The study used qualitative research methods with the... (More)

BACKGROUND: International middle- and long-distance running competitions attract millions of spectators in association with city races, world championships, and Olympic Games. It is therefore a major concern that ill health and pain, as a result of sports overuse, lead to numerous hours of lost training and decreased performance in competitive runners. Despite its potential for sustenance of performance, approval of mHealth self-report monitoring (mHSM) in this group of athletes has not been investigated.

OBJECTIVE: The objective of our study was to explore individual and situational factors associated with the acceptance of long-term mHSM in competitive runners.

METHODS: The study used qualitative research methods with the Technology Acceptance Model as the theoretical foundation. The study population included 20 middle- and long-distance runners competing at national and international levels. Two mHSM apps asking for health and training data from track and marathon runners were created on a platform for web survey development (Briteback AB). Data collection for the technology acceptance analysis was performed via personal interviews before and after a 6-week monitoring period. Preuse interviews investigated experience and knowledge of mHealth monitoring and thoughts on benefits and possible side effects. The postuse interviews addressed usability and usefulness, attitudes toward nonfunctional issues, and intentions to adhere to long-term monitoring. In addition, the runners' trustworthiness when providing mHSM data was discussed. The interview data were investigated using a deductive thematic analysis.

RESULTS: The mHSM apps were considered technically easy to use. Although the runners read the instructions and entered data effortlessly, some still perceived mHSM as problematic. Concerns were raised about the selection of items for monitoring (eg, recording training load as running distance or time) and about interpretation of concepts (eg, whether subjective well-being should encompass only the running context or daily living on the whole). Usefulness of specific mHSM apps was consequently not appraised on the same bases in different subcategories of runners. Regarding nonfunctional issues, the runners competing at the international level requested detailed control over who in their sports club and national federation should be allowed access to their data; the less competitive runners had no such issues. Notwithstanding, the runners were willing to adhere to long-term mHSM, provided the technology was adjusted to their personal routines and the output was perceived as contributing to running performance.

CONCLUSIONS: Adoption of mHSM by competitive runners requires clear definitions of monitoring purpose and populations, repeated in practice tests of monitoring items and terminology, and meticulousness regarding data-sharing routines. Further naturalistic studies of mHSM use in routine sports practice settings are needed with nonfunctional ethical and legal issues included in the evaluation designs.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
JMIR mHealth and uHealth
volume
6
issue
8
external identifiers
  • scopus:85052896825
  • scopus:85060372490
ISSN
2291-5222
DOI
10.2196/10270
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
428d917d-5e3b-4ee8-865d-d5a0c8d24f56
date added to LUP
2018-10-05 16:17:54
date last changed
2019-02-20 11:29:25
@article{428d917d-5e3b-4ee8-865d-d5a0c8d24f56,
  abstract     = {<p>BACKGROUND: International middle- and long-distance running competitions attract millions of spectators in association with city races, world championships, and Olympic Games. It is therefore a major concern that ill health and pain, as a result of sports overuse, lead to numerous hours of lost training and decreased performance in competitive runners. Despite its potential for sustenance of performance, approval of mHealth self-report monitoring (mHSM) in this group of athletes has not been investigated.</p><p>OBJECTIVE: The objective of our study was to explore individual and situational factors associated with the acceptance of long-term mHSM in competitive runners.</p><p>METHODS: The study used qualitative research methods with the Technology Acceptance Model as the theoretical foundation. The study population included 20 middle- and long-distance runners competing at national and international levels. Two mHSM apps asking for health and training data from track and marathon runners were created on a platform for web survey development (Briteback AB). Data collection for the technology acceptance analysis was performed via personal interviews before and after a 6-week monitoring period. Preuse interviews investigated experience and knowledge of mHealth monitoring and thoughts on benefits and possible side effects. The postuse interviews addressed usability and usefulness, attitudes toward nonfunctional issues, and intentions to adhere to long-term monitoring. In addition, the runners' trustworthiness when providing mHSM data was discussed. The interview data were investigated using a deductive thematic analysis.</p><p>RESULTS: The mHSM apps were considered technically easy to use. Although the runners read the instructions and entered data effortlessly, some still perceived mHSM as problematic. Concerns were raised about the selection of items for monitoring (eg, recording training load as running distance or time) and about interpretation of concepts (eg, whether subjective well-being should encompass only the running context or daily living on the whole). Usefulness of specific mHSM apps was consequently not appraised on the same bases in different subcategories of runners. Regarding nonfunctional issues, the runners competing at the international level requested detailed control over who in their sports club and national federation should be allowed access to their data; the less competitive runners had no such issues. Notwithstanding, the runners were willing to adhere to long-term mHSM, provided the technology was adjusted to their personal routines and the output was perceived as contributing to running performance.</p><p>CONCLUSIONS: Adoption of mHSM by competitive runners requires clear definitions of monitoring purpose and populations, repeated in practice tests of monitoring items and terminology, and meticulousness regarding data-sharing routines. Further naturalistic studies of mHSM use in routine sports practice settings are needed with nonfunctional ethical and legal issues included in the evaluation designs.</p>},
  articleno    = {e10270},
  author       = {Rönnby, Sara and Lundberg, Oscar and Fagher, Kristina and Jacobsson, Jenny and Tillander, Bo and Gauffin, Håkan and Hansson, Per-Olof and Dahlström, Örjan and Timpka, Toomas},
  issn         = {2291-5222},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {08},
  number       = {8},
  series       = {JMIR mHealth and uHealth},
  title        = {mHealth Self-Report Monitoring in Competitive Middle- and Long-Distance Runners : Qualitative Study of Long-Term Use Intentions Using the Technology Acceptance Model},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/10270},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2018},
}