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Frequency tracking in acoustic trapping for improved performance stability and system surveillance.

Hammarström, Björn LU ; Evander, Mikael LU ; Wahlström, Jacob and Nilsson, Johan LU (2014) In Lab on A Chip 14(5). p.1005-1013
Abstract
This work proposes and demonstrates an acoustic trapping system where the trapping frequency is automatically determined and can be used to analyse changes in the acoustic trap. Critical for the functionality of this system is the use of a kerfed transducer that removes spurious resonances. This makes it possible to determine the optimal trapping frequency by analysing electrical impedance. It is demonstrated that the novel combination of a kerfed transducer and acoustic trapping in glass capillaries creates a high Q-value resonator. This narrows the frequency bandwidth but allows excellent performance, as confirmed by a ten-fold increase in the flow retention speed when compared to previously reported values. Importantly, the use of... (More)
This work proposes and demonstrates an acoustic trapping system where the trapping frequency is automatically determined and can be used to analyse changes in the acoustic trap. Critical for the functionality of this system is the use of a kerfed transducer that removes spurious resonances. This makes it possible to determine the optimal trapping frequency by analysing electrical impedance. It is demonstrated that the novel combination of a kerfed transducer and acoustic trapping in glass capillaries creates a high Q-value resonator. This narrows the frequency bandwidth but allows excellent performance, as confirmed by a ten-fold increase in the flow retention speed when compared to previously reported values. Importantly, the use of automatic frequency tracking allows the use of such a narrow bandwidth resonator without compromising system stability. As changes in temperature, buffer-properties, and the amount of captured particles will affect the properties of the acoustic resonator, corresponding changes in resonance frequency will occur. It is shown that such frequency changes can be accurately tracked using the setup. Therefore, monitoring the frequency over time adds a new feature to acoustic trapping, where experimental progress can be monitored and the amount of trapped material can be quantified. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Lab on A Chip
volume
14
issue
5
pages
1005 - 1013
publisher
Royal Society of Chemistry
external identifiers
  • pmid:24441874
  • wos:000330784400022
  • scopus:84893508776
ISSN
1473-0189
DOI
10.1039/c3lc51144h
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
5a8d205f-7a58-4f3d-b9d3-848573e110d8 (old id 4291099)
date added to LUP
2014-02-13 09:26:26
date last changed
2017-09-17 03:07:30
@article{5a8d205f-7a58-4f3d-b9d3-848573e110d8,
  abstract     = {This work proposes and demonstrates an acoustic trapping system where the trapping frequency is automatically determined and can be used to analyse changes in the acoustic trap. Critical for the functionality of this system is the use of a kerfed transducer that removes spurious resonances. This makes it possible to determine the optimal trapping frequency by analysing electrical impedance. It is demonstrated that the novel combination of a kerfed transducer and acoustic trapping in glass capillaries creates a high Q-value resonator. This narrows the frequency bandwidth but allows excellent performance, as confirmed by a ten-fold increase in the flow retention speed when compared to previously reported values. Importantly, the use of automatic frequency tracking allows the use of such a narrow bandwidth resonator without compromising system stability. As changes in temperature, buffer-properties, and the amount of captured particles will affect the properties of the acoustic resonator, corresponding changes in resonance frequency will occur. It is shown that such frequency changes can be accurately tracked using the setup. Therefore, monitoring the frequency over time adds a new feature to acoustic trapping, where experimental progress can be monitored and the amount of trapped material can be quantified.},
  author       = {Hammarström, Björn and Evander, Mikael and Wahlström, Jacob and Nilsson, Johan},
  issn         = {1473-0189},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {1005--1013},
  publisher    = {Royal Society of Chemistry},
  series       = {Lab on A Chip},
  title        = {Frequency tracking in acoustic trapping for improved performance stability and system surveillance.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c3lc51144h},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2014},
}