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Swedish Female Hairdressers' Views on Their Work Environment - A Qualitative Study.

Diab, Kerstin LU ; Nielsen, Jörn LU and Andersson, Edith LU (2014) In Journal of Occupational Health 56(2). p.100-110
Abstract
Objectives: Hairdressers have several work-related health hazards. Little is known of their strategies for the work environment. The aim of this study was to explore female hairdressers' own views on their physical, social and psychological work environment as possibilities of influencing it, implementation of their knowledge, financial impacts and how work-related symptoms affect their views. Methods: Fourteen hairdressers working for four years were subjected to open-ended interviews covering aspects of the physical, social and psychological work environment. Content analysis was applied. Results: An awareness of the impact of the work environment and the possibilities of influencing it emerged, but also an inability to achieve... (More)
Objectives: Hairdressers have several work-related health hazards. Little is known of their strategies for the work environment. The aim of this study was to explore female hairdressers' own views on their physical, social and psychological work environment as possibilities of influencing it, implementation of their knowledge, financial impacts and how work-related symptoms affect their views. Methods: Fourteen hairdressers working for four years were subjected to open-ended interviews covering aspects of the physical, social and psychological work environment. Content analysis was applied. Results: An awareness of the impact of the work environment and the possibilities of influencing it emerged, but also an inability to achieve preventive improvements. This included reflections concerning ventilation, health issues, job strain, hair products, financial issues, knowledge from school and concern for having to leave the profession. The organization and acceptance of the work environment were important issues. Making the work environment an active part of their business was not common. Conclusions: Female hairdressers had an awareness of their work environment but lacked the means and strategies to make it an active part of their business. The main focus was on the customers and the work techniques. Having various symptoms did not alter this. Organizational and financial issues could put limitations on the work environment. Teachers were crucial in making the work environment interesting. Hairdressing was seen with advantages and disadvantages, and its future was seen as being insecure in terms of the occupational health risks. The hairdressers expressed a great pride in their profession providing possibilities for development. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Occupational Health
volume
56
issue
2
pages
100 - 110
publisher
Japan Society for Occupational Health
external identifiers
  • pmid:24430839
  • wos:000334559800003
  • scopus:84901329517
ISSN
1348-9585
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f7af2c26-9df5-4c30-ba74-3c4b937f95bd (old id 4291320)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24430839?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-02-07 21:20:03
date last changed
2017-03-26 03:04:56
@article{f7af2c26-9df5-4c30-ba74-3c4b937f95bd,
  abstract     = {Objectives: Hairdressers have several work-related health hazards. Little is known of their strategies for the work environment. The aim of this study was to explore female hairdressers' own views on their physical, social and psychological work environment as possibilities of influencing it, implementation of their knowledge, financial impacts and how work-related symptoms affect their views. Methods: Fourteen hairdressers working for four years were subjected to open-ended interviews covering aspects of the physical, social and psychological work environment. Content analysis was applied. Results: An awareness of the impact of the work environment and the possibilities of influencing it emerged, but also an inability to achieve preventive improvements. This included reflections concerning ventilation, health issues, job strain, hair products, financial issues, knowledge from school and concern for having to leave the profession. The organization and acceptance of the work environment were important issues. Making the work environment an active part of their business was not common. Conclusions: Female hairdressers had an awareness of their work environment but lacked the means and strategies to make it an active part of their business. The main focus was on the customers and the work techniques. Having various symptoms did not alter this. Organizational and financial issues could put limitations on the work environment. Teachers were crucial in making the work environment interesting. Hairdressing was seen with advantages and disadvantages, and its future was seen as being insecure in terms of the occupational health risks. The hairdressers expressed a great pride in their profession providing possibilities for development.},
  author       = {Diab, Kerstin and Nielsen, Jörn and Andersson, Edith},
  issn         = {1348-9585},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {100--110},
  publisher    = {Japan Society for Occupational Health},
  series       = {Journal of Occupational Health},
  title        = {Swedish Female Hairdressers' Views on Their Work Environment - A Qualitative Study.},
  volume       = {56},
  year         = {2014},
}