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Conundrum of mechanical knee symptoms : Signifying feature of a meniscal tear?

Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Pihl, Kenneth; Nissen, Nis; Jørgensen, Uffe; Fristed, Jakob Vium; Lohmander, L. Stefan LU and Englund, Martin LU (2018) In British journal of sports medicine
Abstract

Background: Mechanical knee symptoms are often considered important in the decision to perform knee arthroscopy on the suspicion of a meniscal tear. We investigated if presence of a meniscal tear at knee arthroscopy in adults is associated with presence of preoperative self-reported mechanical knee symptoms. Methods: We used data from Knee Arthroscopy Cohort Southern Denmark (KACS). KACS consists of patients aged 18 years or older referred to knee arthroscopy on the suspicion of a meniscal tear at four recruiting hospitals between 1 February 2013 and 31 January 2015. Of 1259 invited patients, 908 (72%) replied to the baseline questionnaire. With 91 patients excluded, the study sample consisted of 641 and 176 patients with and without a... (More)

Background: Mechanical knee symptoms are often considered important in the decision to perform knee arthroscopy on the suspicion of a meniscal tear. We investigated if presence of a meniscal tear at knee arthroscopy in adults is associated with presence of preoperative self-reported mechanical knee symptoms. Methods: We used data from Knee Arthroscopy Cohort Southern Denmark (KACS). KACS consists of patients aged 18 years or older referred to knee arthroscopy on the suspicion of a meniscal tear at four recruiting hospitals between 1 February 2013 and 31 January 2015. Of 1259 invited patients, 908 (72%) replied to the baseline questionnaire. With 91 patients excluded, the study sample consisted of 641 and 176 patients with and without a meniscal tear confirmed at surgery, respectively. Exposure was meniscal tear as determined by the knee surgeon during arthroscopy. Main outcomes were preoperative mechanical knee symptoms defined as self-reported catching/locking or self-reported inability to straighten knee fully. Results: 55% of all patients reported symptoms of catching/locking and 47% were unable to straighten their knee fully. Preoperative mechanical symptoms were equally prevalent in patients with and without a meniscal tear (prevalence ratio catching/locking 0.89, 95% CI 0.77 to 1.03, and inability to straighten knee fully, prevalence ratio 1.02, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.23). Interpretation: Patient-reported mechanical symptoms were equally common irrespective of presence or absence of a meniscal tear in patients undergoing arthroscopy for suspicion of a meniscal tear. Our findings suggest that mechanical knee symptoms have a limited value when considering indication for meniscal surgery. Trial registration number: NCT01871272; Results.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
arthroscopy, epidemiology, knee, meniscal pathology, osteoarthritis
in
British journal of sports medicine
publisher
BMJ Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • scopus:85052912113
ISSN
0306-3674
DOI
10.1136/bjsports-2018-099431
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4315ab7e-1cfb-4f6a-80e7-33f372338142
date added to LUP
2018-10-24 11:07:32
date last changed
2019-05-14 04:46:24
@article{4315ab7e-1cfb-4f6a-80e7-33f372338142,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Mechanical knee symptoms are often considered important in the decision to perform knee arthroscopy on the suspicion of a meniscal tear. We investigated if presence of a meniscal tear at knee arthroscopy in adults is associated with presence of preoperative self-reported mechanical knee symptoms. Methods: We used data from Knee Arthroscopy Cohort Southern Denmark (KACS). KACS consists of patients aged 18 years or older referred to knee arthroscopy on the suspicion of a meniscal tear at four recruiting hospitals between 1 February 2013 and 31 January 2015. Of 1259 invited patients, 908 (72%) replied to the baseline questionnaire. With 91 patients excluded, the study sample consisted of 641 and 176 patients with and without a meniscal tear confirmed at surgery, respectively. Exposure was meniscal tear as determined by the knee surgeon during arthroscopy. Main outcomes were preoperative mechanical knee symptoms defined as self-reported catching/locking or self-reported inability to straighten knee fully. Results: 55% of all patients reported symptoms of catching/locking and 47% were unable to straighten their knee fully. Preoperative mechanical symptoms were equally prevalent in patients with and without a meniscal tear (prevalence ratio catching/locking 0.89, 95% CI 0.77 to 1.03, and inability to straighten knee fully, prevalence ratio 1.02, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.23). Interpretation: Patient-reported mechanical symptoms were equally common irrespective of presence or absence of a meniscal tear in patients undergoing arthroscopy for suspicion of a meniscal tear. Our findings suggest that mechanical knee symptoms have a limited value when considering indication for meniscal surgery. Trial registration number: NCT01871272; Results.</p>},
  author       = {Thorlund, Jonas Bloch and Pihl, Kenneth and Nissen, Nis and Jørgensen, Uffe and Fristed, Jakob Vium and Lohmander, L. Stefan and Englund, Martin},
  issn         = {0306-3674},
  keyword      = {arthroscopy,epidemiology,knee,meniscal pathology,osteoarthritis},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {08},
  publisher    = {BMJ Publishing Group},
  series       = {British journal of sports medicine},
  title        = {Conundrum of mechanical knee symptoms : Signifying feature of a meniscal tear?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2018-099431},
  year         = {2018},
}