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Smoking, disease characteristics and serum cytokine levels in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome

Olsson, Peter LU ; Skogstrand, Kristin; Nilsson, Anna LU ; Turesson, Carl LU ; Jacobsson, Lennart T H LU ; Theander, Elke LU ; Houen, Gunnar and Mandl, Thomas LU (2018) In Rheumatology International
Abstract

Smoking affects several disease processes. Epidemiological studies have previously found a negative association between primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) and smoking. The aim of this study was to examine whether markers of disease activity and cytokine expression in pSS patients differ between ever and never smokers. Fifty-one consecutive pSS patients and 33 population controls were included in the study. Clinical and standard laboratory parameters were registered. Serum cytokines (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-17, IL-18, IL-33, IFN-α, IFN-γ, TNF-α, EGF, BAFF, Fas-ligand, RANTES, TGF-β1) were assessed. A positive lip biopsy was less prevalent among ever smoking patients compared to never smokers (81 vs 100%; p =... (More)

Smoking affects several disease processes. Epidemiological studies have previously found a negative association between primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) and smoking. The aim of this study was to examine whether markers of disease activity and cytokine expression in pSS patients differ between ever and never smokers. Fifty-one consecutive pSS patients and 33 population controls were included in the study. Clinical and standard laboratory parameters were registered. Serum cytokines (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-17, IL-18, IL-33, IFN-α, IFN-γ, TNF-α, EGF, BAFF, Fas-ligand, RANTES, TGF-β1) were assessed. A positive lip biopsy was less prevalent among ever smoking patients compared to never smokers (81 vs 100%; p = 0.03). However, except for TNF-α, which was higher in ever smokers, no differences in cytokine levels were found when comparing ever and never smoking pSS patients. Furthermore, no significant differences were found between ever and never smoking patients in the ESSDAI total score, IgG levels, or complement levels. However, IL-6, IL-12, IL-17 and IL-18 were significantly increased in pSS patients compared to controls. In this study, a negative association between ever smoking and positive lip biopsy was found, confirming previous reports. Expected differences in cytokine levels compared to controls were noted, but no major differences were found between ever and never smoking pSS patients. Taking into account the negative association between pSS diagnosis and smoking in epidemiological studies, possible explanations include a local effect of smoking on salivary glands rather than systemic effects by cigarette smoke.

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Rheumatology International
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:85047837439
ISSN
1437-160X
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
432c17ed-0b99-4117-81f6-c9d199d88a1a
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https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00296-018-4063-8
date added to LUP
2018-05-31 13:40:27
date last changed
2018-11-21 21:40:07
@article{432c17ed-0b99-4117-81f6-c9d199d88a1a,
  abstract     = {<p>Smoking affects several disease processes. Epidemiological studies have previously found a negative association between primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) and smoking. The aim of this study was to examine whether markers of disease activity and cytokine expression in pSS patients differ between ever and never smokers. Fifty-one consecutive pSS patients and 33 population controls were included in the study. Clinical and standard laboratory parameters were registered. Serum cytokines (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-17, IL-18, IL-33, IFN-α, IFN-γ, TNF-α, EGF, BAFF, Fas-ligand, RANTES, TGF-β1) were assessed. A positive lip biopsy was less prevalent among ever smoking patients compared to never smokers (81 vs 100%; p = 0.03). However, except for TNF-α, which was higher in ever smokers, no differences in cytokine levels were found when comparing ever and never smoking pSS patients. Furthermore, no significant differences were found between ever and never smoking patients in the ESSDAI total score, IgG levels, or complement levels. However, IL-6, IL-12, IL-17 and IL-18 were significantly increased in pSS patients compared to controls. In this study, a negative association between ever smoking and positive lip biopsy was found, confirming previous reports. Expected differences in cytokine levels compared to controls were noted, but no major differences were found between ever and never smoking pSS patients. Taking into account the negative association between pSS diagnosis and smoking in epidemiological studies, possible explanations include a local effect of smoking on salivary glands rather than systemic effects by cigarette smoke.</p>},
  author       = {Olsson, Peter and Skogstrand, Kristin and Nilsson, Anna and Turesson, Carl and Jacobsson, Lennart T H and Theander, Elke and Houen, Gunnar and Mandl, Thomas},
  issn         = {1437-160X},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {05},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Rheumatology International},
  title        = {Smoking, disease characteristics and serum cytokine levels in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome},
  year         = {2018},
}