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Implementation of robot-assisted gynecologic surgery for patients with low and high BMI in a German gynecological cancer center.

Kannisto, Päivi LU ; Harter, Philipp; Heitz, Florian; Traut, Alexander; du Bois, Andreas and Kurzeder, Christian (2014) In Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics 290(1). p.143-148
Abstract
Purpose To present a single center outcome from an initial series of gynecological robotic cases with a special reference to obese patients. Methods A retrospective evaluation of 116 women, undergoing elective gynecologic robot-assisted surgery from February 2011 to December 2012. Procedures included hysterectomy (HE), radical HE, adnexectomy, myomectomy, pelvic lymphadenectomy and paraaortic lymphadenectomy, sentinel node extraction, and omentectomy. The feasibility and outcome were investigated in relation to normal and high body mass index (BMI < 30 and BMI ≥ 30). Results The overall complication rate was low (15/116; 12.9 %). The number of perioperative complications was not different between the patients with normal BMI compared to... (More)
Purpose To present a single center outcome from an initial series of gynecological robotic cases with a special reference to obese patients. Methods A retrospective evaluation of 116 women, undergoing elective gynecologic robot-assisted surgery from February 2011 to December 2012. Procedures included hysterectomy (HE), radical HE, adnexectomy, myomectomy, pelvic lymphadenectomy and paraaortic lymphadenectomy, sentinel node extraction, and omentectomy. The feasibility and outcome were investigated in relation to normal and high body mass index (BMI < 30 and BMI ≥ 30). Results The overall complication rate was low (15/116; 12.9 %). The number of perioperative complications was not different between the patients with normal BMI compared to those with high BMI. Five operations were converted to open surgery due to vascular injury (2), intestinal injury (2) and one insufficiently exposed paraaortic field in an endometrial cancer patient. Urinary bladder was injured once. Late complications included vaginal dehisce (2), vaginal hemorrhage (1), cuff hematoma (4), lymphocyst (1) and two urinary tract injuries. The rate of the late complications was not significantly different in the two groups of patients (p = 0.139). A significant difference in patients’ positioning time was observed between normal weighted and obese patients (35 and 55 min, p < 0.001). Conclusion Robotic procedure was feasible and could be implemented for treating the first setting of mixed indications for gynecologic surgery. Robotic surgery may offer particular advantages in obese patients with no conversions and no wound complications. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics
volume
290
issue
1
pages
143 - 148
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:24532013
  • wos:000337787600023
  • scopus:84903604435
ISSN
1432-0711
DOI
10.1007/s00404-014-3169-9
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9fc90943-b229-43a1-8c2c-abb525bd78f5 (old id 4334569)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24532013?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-03-05 22:36:40
date last changed
2017-09-24 03:12:31
@article{9fc90943-b229-43a1-8c2c-abb525bd78f5,
  abstract     = {Purpose To present a single center outcome from an initial series of gynecological robotic cases with a special reference to obese patients. Methods A retrospective evaluation of 116 women, undergoing elective gynecologic robot-assisted surgery from February 2011 to December 2012. Procedures included hysterectomy (HE), radical HE, adnexectomy, myomectomy, pelvic lymphadenectomy and paraaortic lymphadenectomy, sentinel node extraction, and omentectomy. The feasibility and outcome were investigated in relation to normal and high body mass index (BMI &lt; 30 and BMI ≥ 30). Results The overall complication rate was low (15/116; 12.9 %). The number of perioperative complications was not different between the patients with normal BMI compared to those with high BMI. Five operations were converted to open surgery due to vascular injury (2), intestinal injury (2) and one insufficiently exposed paraaortic field in an endometrial cancer patient. Urinary bladder was injured once. Late complications included vaginal dehisce (2), vaginal hemorrhage (1), cuff hematoma (4), lymphocyst (1) and two urinary tract injuries. The rate of the late complications was not significantly different in the two groups of patients (p = 0.139). A significant difference in patients’ positioning time was observed between normal weighted and obese patients (35 and 55 min, p &lt; 0.001). Conclusion Robotic procedure was feasible and could be implemented for treating the first setting of mixed indications for gynecologic surgery. Robotic surgery may offer particular advantages in obese patients with no conversions and no wound complications.},
  author       = {Kannisto, Päivi and Harter, Philipp and Heitz, Florian and Traut, Alexander and du Bois, Andreas and Kurzeder, Christian},
  issn         = {1432-0711},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {143--148},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics},
  title        = {Implementation of robot-assisted gynecologic surgery for patients with low and high BMI in a German gynecological cancer center.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00404-014-3169-9},
  volume       = {290},
  year         = {2014},
}