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Family History of Myocardial Infarction Increases Risk of Renal Dysfunction in Middle Age.

Christensson, Anders LU ; Melander, Olle LU ; Fjellstedt, Erik and Ohlson Andersson, Maria LU (2014) In American Journal of Nephrology 39(2). p.85-91
Abstract
Background/Aims: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common in the general population, may lead to end-stage renal disease, and is most frequently found among males. Familial clustering of kidney diseases has been observed. We aimed to study a potential association between the family history of myocardial infarction (MI) and renal dysfunction. Methods: 22,297 males and 10,828 females, aged 33-60 years, from a population-based cohort study were studied. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was assessed by the CKD-EPI creatinine equation. Every participant filled in a self-administered questionnaire including family history. Heredity for MI was defined as mother or father having had MI and/or died from MI, and/or brother or sister having... (More)
Background/Aims: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common in the general population, may lead to end-stage renal disease, and is most frequently found among males. Familial clustering of kidney diseases has been observed. We aimed to study a potential association between the family history of myocardial infarction (MI) and renal dysfunction. Methods: 22,297 males and 10,828 females, aged 33-60 years, from a population-based cohort study were studied. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was assessed by the CKD-EPI creatinine equation. Every participant filled in a self-administered questionnaire including family history. Heredity for MI was defined as mother or father having had MI and/or died from MI, and/or brother or sister having had MI. Binary logistic regression and multiple linear regression were used in the analyses. Results: Multiple linear regression revealed a significantly increased risk of renal dysfunction in those with a positive heredity for MI (the whole cohort p = 0.01, males p = 0.000, females p = 0.169). Binary logistic regression showed that males with heredity for MI with a mean age of 43 years have a 2 times higher risk (p = 0.02) of belonging to the group with GFR <45 ml/min/1.73 m(2) compared to those without heredity. For the whole cohort the increased risk was 1.6 times (p = 0.07). There was no significant association for females (p = 0.88). Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that a familial burden of MI is associated with renal dysfunction, in men, already in middle age. Genetic variants may underlie predisposition to CKD in those with heredity for MI. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
American Journal of Nephrology
volume
39
issue
2
pages
85 - 91
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • pmid:24481112
  • wos:000332904300001
  • scopus:84893171891
ISSN
1421-9670
DOI
10.1159/000358259
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
55666bc2-3b12-489a-8c66-28875a7d30b0 (old id 4336146)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24481112?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-03-06 17:53:55
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:11:00
@article{55666bc2-3b12-489a-8c66-28875a7d30b0,
  abstract     = {Background/Aims: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common in the general population, may lead to end-stage renal disease, and is most frequently found among males. Familial clustering of kidney diseases has been observed. We aimed to study a potential association between the family history of myocardial infarction (MI) and renal dysfunction. Methods: 22,297 males and 10,828 females, aged 33-60 years, from a population-based cohort study were studied. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was assessed by the CKD-EPI creatinine equation. Every participant filled in a self-administered questionnaire including family history. Heredity for MI was defined as mother or father having had MI and/or died from MI, and/or brother or sister having had MI. Binary logistic regression and multiple linear regression were used in the analyses. Results: Multiple linear regression revealed a significantly increased risk of renal dysfunction in those with a positive heredity for MI (the whole cohort p = 0.01, males p = 0.000, females p = 0.169). Binary logistic regression showed that males with heredity for MI with a mean age of 43 years have a 2 times higher risk (p = 0.02) of belonging to the group with GFR &lt;45 ml/min/1.73 m(2) compared to those without heredity. For the whole cohort the increased risk was 1.6 times (p = 0.07). There was no significant association for females (p = 0.88). Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that a familial burden of MI is associated with renal dysfunction, in men, already in middle age. Genetic variants may underlie predisposition to CKD in those with heredity for MI. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.},
  author       = {Christensson, Anders and Melander, Olle and Fjellstedt, Erik and Ohlson Andersson, Maria},
  issn         = {1421-9670},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {85--91},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {American Journal of Nephrology},
  title        = {Family History of Myocardial Infarction Increases Risk of Renal Dysfunction in Middle Age.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000358259},
  volume       = {39},
  year         = {2014},
}