Advanced

Individual Facial Coloration in Male Eulemur fulvus rufus: A Condition-dependent Ornament?

Clough, Dagmar LU ; Heistermann, Michael and Kappeler, Peter M. (2009) In International Journal of Primatology 30(6). p.859-875
Abstract
Researchers studying individual variation in conspicuous skin coloration in primates have suggested that color indicates male quality. Although primate fur color can also be flamboyant, the potential condition dependence and thus signaling function of fur remains poorly studied. We studied sources of variation in sexually dichromatic facial hair coloration in red-fronted lemurs (Eulemur fulvus rufus). We collected data on 13 adult males in Kirindy Forest, Madagascar, during two study periods in 2006 and 2007, to determine whether variation in facial hair coloration correlates with male age, rank, androgen status, and reproductive success. We quantified facial hair coloration via standardized digital photographs of each male, assessed... (More)
Researchers studying individual variation in conspicuous skin coloration in primates have suggested that color indicates male quality. Although primate fur color can also be flamboyant, the potential condition dependence and thus signaling function of fur remains poorly studied. We studied sources of variation in sexually dichromatic facial hair coloration in red-fronted lemurs (Eulemur fulvus rufus). We collected data on 13 adult males in Kirindy Forest, Madagascar, during two study periods in 2006 and 2007, to determine whether variation in facial hair coloration correlates with male age, rank, androgen status, and reproductive success. We quantified facial hair coloration via standardized digital photographs of each male, assessed androgen status using fecal hormone measurements, and obtained data on reproductive success through genetic paternity analyses. Male facial hair coloration showed high individual variation, and baseline coloration was related to individual androgen status but not to any other parameter tested. Color did not reflect rapid androgen changes during the mating season. However, pronounced long-term changes in androgen levels between years were accompanied by changes in facial hair coloration. Our data suggest that facial hair coloration in red-fronted lemur males is under proximate control of androgens and may provide some information about male quality, but it does not correlate with dominance rank or male reproductive success. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
androgen, coloration, condition-dependent trait, Eulemur fulvus Rufus, facial hair
in
International Journal of Primatology
volume
30
issue
6
pages
859 - 875
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:77952742857
ISSN
1573-8604
DOI
10.1007/s10764-009-9379-5
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
acfb7e91-13ed-4ad6-8239-6eddf2dfbbf3 (old id 4342382)
date added to LUP
2014-03-11 14:19:09
date last changed
2017-10-29 03:35:32
@article{acfb7e91-13ed-4ad6-8239-6eddf2dfbbf3,
  abstract     = {Researchers studying individual variation in conspicuous skin coloration in primates have suggested that color indicates male quality. Although primate fur color can also be flamboyant, the potential condition dependence and thus signaling function of fur remains poorly studied. We studied sources of variation in sexually dichromatic facial hair coloration in red-fronted lemurs (Eulemur fulvus rufus). We collected data on 13 adult males in Kirindy Forest, Madagascar, during two study periods in 2006 and 2007, to determine whether variation in facial hair coloration correlates with male age, rank, androgen status, and reproductive success. We quantified facial hair coloration via standardized digital photographs of each male, assessed androgen status using fecal hormone measurements, and obtained data on reproductive success through genetic paternity analyses. Male facial hair coloration showed high individual variation, and baseline coloration was related to individual androgen status but not to any other parameter tested. Color did not reflect rapid androgen changes during the mating season. However, pronounced long-term changes in androgen levels between years were accompanied by changes in facial hair coloration. Our data suggest that facial hair coloration in red-fronted lemur males is under proximate control of androgens and may provide some information about male quality, but it does not correlate with dominance rank or male reproductive success.},
  author       = {Clough, Dagmar and Heistermann, Michael and Kappeler, Peter M.},
  issn         = {1573-8604},
  keyword      = {androgen,coloration,condition-dependent trait,Eulemur fulvus Rufus,facial hair},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {859--875},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {International Journal of Primatology},
  title        = {Individual Facial Coloration in Male Eulemur fulvus rufus: A Condition-dependent Ornament?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10764-009-9379-5},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {2009},
}