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The role of discourses in governing forests to combat climate change

Nielsen, Tobias LU (2014) In International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics 14(3). p.265-280
Abstract
Reducing emissions from forest degradation and deforestation, conserving and enhancing forest carbon stocks, and sustainably managing forests (REDD+) has emerged as one of the most anticipated climate change mitigation tools. This paper aims to understand and identify the underlying discourses that have dominated the emergence of REDD+, by identifying the key story lines in the policy and academic debates on REDD+. As such, this paper takes a step away from the “fine-tuning” of policy recommendations and instead studies REDD+ from a more theoretical approach with the intent to provide a critical analysis of the ideational structures that shape the policies that have emerged around REDD+. The analysis shows that ecological modernization and... (More)
Reducing emissions from forest degradation and deforestation, conserving and enhancing forest carbon stocks, and sustainably managing forests (REDD+) has emerged as one of the most anticipated climate change mitigation tools. This paper aims to understand and identify the underlying discourses that have dominated the emergence of REDD+, by identifying the key story lines in the policy and academic debates on REDD+. As such, this paper takes a step away from the “fine-tuning” of policy recommendations and instead studies REDD+ from a more theoretical approach with the intent to provide a critical analysis of the ideational structures that shape the policies that have emerged around REDD+. The analysis shows that ecological modernization and its accompanying story lines constitute a dominant notion of REDD+ as being able to manage the complexities of forest in a synergetic way, combining cost-efficient and effective mitigation with sustainable development. The paper also identifies the critical counter discourse of civic environmentalism, which criticizes this notion of REDD+ and instead promotes issues such as equity, the importance of local knowledge, and the participatory process. It argues that reducing deforestation involves trade-offs between economic, ecological, and social dimensions, also arguing that REDD+ fits overwhelmingly with the interest of the global North. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics
volume
14
issue
3
pages
265 - 280
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000340495500004
  • scopus:84925519660
ISSN
1573-1553
DOI
10.1007/s10784-013-9223-4
project
Words Matter in the Woods: Discourses on Deforestation in Global Climate Politics
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
40566fe4-ee5d-41dc-83bf-db2b22dd9160 (old id 4350974)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 11:07:59
date last changed
2020-09-09 01:54:05
@article{40566fe4-ee5d-41dc-83bf-db2b22dd9160,
  abstract     = {Reducing emissions from forest degradation and deforestation, conserving and enhancing forest carbon stocks, and sustainably managing forests (REDD+) has emerged as one of the most anticipated climate change mitigation tools. This paper aims to understand and identify the underlying discourses that have dominated the emergence of REDD+, by identifying the key story lines in the policy and academic debates on REDD+. As such, this paper takes a step away from the “fine-tuning” of policy recommendations and instead studies REDD+ from a more theoretical approach with the intent to provide a critical analysis of the ideational structures that shape the policies that have emerged around REDD+. The analysis shows that ecological modernization and its accompanying story lines constitute a dominant notion of REDD+ as being able to manage the complexities of forest in a synergetic way, combining cost-efficient and effective mitigation with sustainable development. The paper also identifies the critical counter discourse of civic environmentalism, which criticizes this notion of REDD+ and instead promotes issues such as equity, the importance of local knowledge, and the participatory process. It argues that reducing deforestation involves trade-offs between economic, ecological, and social dimensions, also arguing that REDD+ fits overwhelmingly with the interest of the global North.},
  author       = {Nielsen, Tobias},
  issn         = {1573-1553},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {265--280},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics},
  title        = {The role of discourses in governing forests to combat climate change},
  url          = {https://lup.lub.lu.se/search/ws/files/2401559/4350980.pdf},
  doi          = {10.1007/s10784-013-9223-4},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2014},
}