Advanced

The impact of daylight on use of office lighting controls.

Mattsson, Pimkamol LU (2013) 5th VELUX Daylight Symposium
Abstract
Daylight may contribute to energy savings due to that it may eliminate the use of electric lighting. The study was conducted in 18 single-occupant offices to examine the occupants’ use of different kinds of lighting controls in relation to daylight availability. The 3 offices were equipped with the same kind of lighting control. In total, the following 6 different kinds of lighting controls were studied throughout the period of one year:
1. The traditional-manual on/off control,
2. The manual on/off and dimming control,
3. The manual on/automatic off control,
4. The manual on/automatic off with automatic dimming with the lighting setting of 500 lux,
5. The automatic on/off and dimming control with the lighting setting... (More)
Daylight may contribute to energy savings due to that it may eliminate the use of electric lighting. The study was conducted in 18 single-occupant offices to examine the occupants’ use of different kinds of lighting controls in relation to daylight availability. The 3 offices were equipped with the same kind of lighting control. In total, the following 6 different kinds of lighting controls were studied throughout the period of one year:
1. The traditional-manual on/off control,
2. The manual on/off and dimming control,
3. The manual on/automatic off control,
4. The manual on/automatic off with automatic dimming with the lighting setting of 500 lux,
5. The automatic on/off and dimming control with the lighting setting of 500 lux, and
6. The manual, automatic on/off with algorithmic control

To examine the use of each kind of lighting control, switch-on time and occupied time per day were measured in each office, respectively and then the averages for each month were calculated in hours. Further, ratio of the average occupied time to the average switch-on time was calculated to examine how the occupant used electric lighting from ceiling luminaire.
Preliminary findings pointed to the actual impact of daylight on the use of lighting controls. For every kind of lighting control, electric lighting from the luminaires was used less during spring and summer (March-September) than autumn and winter (October-February). Further, it was found from independent sample t-tests that there were significant differences in the use of electric lighting by using the manual on/off, manual dimming, and automatic dimming controls.
(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to conference
publication status
published
subject
keywords
lighting, control , daylight
conference name
5th VELUX Daylight Symposium
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
86e29de8-55ce-48db-a5b8-b0302d10c636 (old id 4358993)
date added to LUP
2014-03-14 10:15:30
date last changed
2017-01-27 14:04:41
@misc{86e29de8-55ce-48db-a5b8-b0302d10c636,
  abstract     = {Daylight may contribute to energy savings due to that it may eliminate the use of electric lighting. The study was conducted in 18 single-occupant offices to examine the occupants’ use of different kinds of lighting controls in relation to daylight availability. The 3 offices were equipped with the same kind of lighting control. In total, the following 6 different kinds of lighting controls were studied throughout the period of one year:<br/>1. The traditional-manual on/off control,<br/>2. The manual on/off and dimming control,<br/>3. The manual on/automatic off control,<br/>4. The manual on/automatic off with automatic dimming with the lighting setting of 500 lux,<br/>5. The automatic on/off and dimming control with the lighting setting of 500 lux, and<br/>6. The manual, automatic on/off with algorithmic control<br/><br/>To examine the use of each kind of lighting control, switch-on time and occupied time per day were measured in each office, respectively and then the averages for each month were calculated in hours. Further, ratio of the average occupied time to the average switch-on time was calculated to examine how the occupant used electric lighting from ceiling luminaire. <br/>Preliminary findings pointed to the actual impact of daylight on the use of lighting controls. For every kind of lighting control, electric lighting from the luminaires was used less during spring and summer (March-September) than autumn and winter (October-February). Further, it was found from independent sample t-tests that there were significant differences in the use of electric lighting by using the manual on/off, manual dimming, and automatic dimming controls. <br/>},
  author       = {Mattsson, Pimkamol},
  keyword      = {lighting,control ,daylight},
  language     = {eng},
  title        = {The impact of daylight on use of office lighting controls.},
  year         = {2013},
}