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Pre-commercial procurement: a demand or supply policy instrument in relation to innovation?

Edquist, Charles LU and Zabala, Jon Mikel LU (2015) In R & D Management 45(2). p.147-160
Abstract
In 2006 the European Commission introduced the concept of "Pre-Commercial Procurement" as an instrument to promote innovation and to mitigate grand challenges. One of the main motives for the support of Pre-Commercial Procurement schemes was to use public needs as a driver for innovation. This concept was also introduced as a response to the need to reinforce the innovation capabilities of the EU, while improving the quality and efficiency of public services.



But what is meant by Pre-Commercial Procurement? Is it a demand or a supply side instrument in relation to innovation? This is the research question addressed in this paper, the goal being motivated by the lack of academic discussion in this direction.

... (More)
In 2006 the European Commission introduced the concept of "Pre-Commercial Procurement" as an instrument to promote innovation and to mitigate grand challenges. One of the main motives for the support of Pre-Commercial Procurement schemes was to use public needs as a driver for innovation. This concept was also introduced as a response to the need to reinforce the innovation capabilities of the EU, while improving the quality and efficiency of public services.



But what is meant by Pre-Commercial Procurement? Is it a demand or a supply side instrument in relation to innovation? This is the research question addressed in this paper, the goal being motivated by the lack of academic discussion in this direction.



The paper is based on three cases, one from the Netherlands, one from the UK and one from Australia. These cases provide evidence that PCP is a matter of R&D funding of a targeted kind, geared towards very specific goals and in a focused way. This leads the authors to conclude that PCP is a supply-side policy instrument in relation to innovation. In this sense, they would like to raise a flag for going back to the origins of the PCP program and calling it a “pre-

competitive R&D program”, rather than labeling it as an innovation

procurement instrument. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Demand, Pre-Commercial procurement, R&D, Supply, Innovation policy, innovation, innovation studies, system of innovation, procurement, economics of innovation, science policy, technology policy, industrial policy, innovation management, management of innovation, industrial economics, economic growth, economic development, institutional economics, innovation system
in
R & D Management
volume
45
issue
2
pages
147 - 160
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000349981800003
  • scopus:84922599728
ISSN
1467-9310
DOI
10.1111/radm.12057http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/radm.12057
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
5b82cf17-84f5-4c99-a8cf-5358ab87d86b (old id 4362525)
date added to LUP
2014-03-25 15:12:05
date last changed
2017-08-27 03:39:25
@article{5b82cf17-84f5-4c99-a8cf-5358ab87d86b,
  abstract     = {In 2006 the European Commission introduced the concept of "Pre-Commercial Procurement" as an instrument to promote innovation and to mitigate grand challenges. One of the main motives for the support of Pre-Commercial Procurement schemes was to use public needs as a driver for innovation. This concept was also introduced as a response to the need to reinforce the innovation capabilities of the EU, while improving the quality and efficiency of public services.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
But what is meant by Pre-Commercial Procurement? Is it a demand or a supply side instrument in relation to innovation? This is the research question addressed in this paper, the goal being motivated by the lack of academic discussion in this direction.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
The paper is based on three cases, one from the Netherlands, one from the UK and one from Australia. These cases provide evidence that PCP is a matter of R&amp;D funding of a targeted kind, geared towards very specific goals and in a focused way. This leads the authors to conclude that PCP is a supply-side policy instrument in relation to innovation. In this sense, they would like to raise a flag for going back to the origins of the PCP program and calling it a “pre-<br/><br>
competitive R&amp;D program”, rather than labeling it as an innovation<br/><br>
procurement instrument.},
  author       = {Edquist, Charles and Zabala, Jon Mikel},
  issn         = {1467-9310},
  keyword      = {Demand,Pre-Commercial procurement,R&D,Supply,Innovation policy,innovation,innovation studies,system of innovation,procurement,economics of innovation,science policy,technology policy,industrial policy,innovation management,management of innovation,industrial economics,economic growth,economic development,institutional economics,innovation system},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {03},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {147--160},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {R & D Management},
  title        = {Pre-commercial procurement: a demand or supply policy instrument in relation to innovation?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/radm.12057http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/radm.12057},
  volume       = {45},
  year         = {2015},
}