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Tracing Changes in the Microbial Community of a Hydrocarbon-Polluted Soil by Culture-Dependent Proteomics

Bastida, F.; Cuevas, César Nicolás LU ; Moreno, J. L.; Hernandez, T. and Garcia, C. (2010) In Pedosphere 20. p.479-485
Abstract
Hydrocarbon contamination may affect the soil microbial community, in terms of both diversity and function. A laboratory experiment was set-up, with a semi-arid control soil and the same soil but artificially contaminated with diesel oil, to follow changes in the dominant species of the microbial community in the hydrocarbon-polluted soil via proteomics. Analysis of the proteins extracted from enriched cultures growing in Luria-Bertani (LB) media showed a change in the microbial community. The majority of the proteins were related to glycolysis pathways, structural or protein synthesis. The results showed a relative increase in the complexity of the soil microbial community with hydrocarbon contamination, especially after 15 days of... (More)
Hydrocarbon contamination may affect the soil microbial community, in terms of both diversity and function. A laboratory experiment was set-up, with a semi-arid control soil and the same soil but artificially contaminated with diesel oil, to follow changes in the dominant species of the microbial community in the hydrocarbon-polluted soil via proteomics. Analysis of the proteins extracted from enriched cultures growing in Luria-Bertani (LB) media showed a change in the microbial community. The majority of the proteins were related to glycolysis pathways, structural or protein synthesis. The results showed a relative increase in the complexity of the soil microbial community with hydrocarbon contamination, especially after 15 days of incubation. Species such as Ralstonia solanacearum, Synechococcus elongatus and different Clostridium sp. were adapted to contamination, not appearing in the control soil, although Bacillus sp. dominated the growing in LB in any of the treatments. We conclude that the identification of microbial species in soil extracts by culture-dependent proteomics is able to partially explain the changes in the diversity of the soil microbial community in hydrocarbon polluted semi-arid soils, but this information is much more limited than that provided by molecular methods. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
culture dependent, hydrocarbon contamination, microbial diversity, proteomics, semiarid soil, symbiobacterium-thermophilum, bacterial diversity, disturbance, biomass, impact, growth
in
Pedosphere
volume
20
pages
479 - 485
publisher
Institute of Soil Science
external identifiers
  • scopus:77954080342
ISSN
1002-0160
DOI
10.1016/S1002-0160(10)60037-9
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
4ca82e76-eac3-4aa4-af91-13dd69e177d0 (old id 4362822)
date added to LUP
2014-03-26 13:21:21
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:54:40
@article{4ca82e76-eac3-4aa4-af91-13dd69e177d0,
  abstract     = {Hydrocarbon contamination may affect the soil microbial community, in terms of both diversity and function. A laboratory experiment was set-up, with a semi-arid control soil and the same soil but artificially contaminated with diesel oil, to follow changes in the dominant species of the microbial community in the hydrocarbon-polluted soil via proteomics. Analysis of the proteins extracted from enriched cultures growing in Luria-Bertani (LB) media showed a change in the microbial community. The majority of the proteins were related to glycolysis pathways, structural or protein synthesis. The results showed a relative increase in the complexity of the soil microbial community with hydrocarbon contamination, especially after 15 days of incubation. Species such as Ralstonia solanacearum, Synechococcus elongatus and different Clostridium sp. were adapted to contamination, not appearing in the control soil, although Bacillus sp. dominated the growing in LB in any of the treatments. We conclude that the identification of microbial species in soil extracts by culture-dependent proteomics is able to partially explain the changes in the diversity of the soil microbial community in hydrocarbon polluted semi-arid soils, but this information is much more limited than that provided by molecular methods.},
  author       = {Bastida, F. and Cuevas, César Nicolás and Moreno, J. L. and Hernandez, T. and Garcia, C.},
  issn         = {1002-0160},
  keyword      = {culture dependent,hydrocarbon contamination,microbial diversity,proteomics,semiarid soil,symbiobacterium-thermophilum,bacterial diversity,disturbance,biomass,impact,growth},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {479--485},
  publisher    = {Institute of Soil Science},
  series       = {Pedosphere},
  title        = {Tracing Changes in the Microbial Community of a Hydrocarbon-Polluted Soil by Culture-Dependent Proteomics},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1002-0160(10)60037-9},
  volume       = {20},
  year         = {2010},
}