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Electoral coordination in Anglophone Africa

Wahman, Michael LU (2014) In Commonwealth & Comparative Politics 52(2). p.187-211
Abstract
Electoral coordination has been a primary concern for scholars of African politics, interested in topics such as ethnic conflict mitigation and democratisation, for decades. However, understanding of micro-level electoral coordination in Sub-Saharan Africa is generally still very limited. This study is the first to investigate voter coordination in Sub-Saharan Africa using constituency-level election results. Studying 20 single-member district elections during the period 1990–2010 in five Anglophone African countries (Botswana, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi and Zambia) demonstrates that many African elections continue to show low levels of electoral coordination. Using a multi-level regression analysis, the study shows that the most important... (More)
Electoral coordination has been a primary concern for scholars of African politics, interested in topics such as ethnic conflict mitigation and democratisation, for decades. However, understanding of micro-level electoral coordination in Sub-Saharan Africa is generally still very limited. This study is the first to investigate voter coordination in Sub-Saharan Africa using constituency-level election results. Studying 20 single-member district elections during the period 1990–2010 in five Anglophone African countries (Botswana, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi and Zambia) demonstrates that many African elections continue to show low levels of electoral coordination. Using a multi-level regression analysis, the study shows that the most important explanation for low levels of coordination across Africa is high voter volatility. It is argued that insufficient information makes it hard for voters and candidates to act strategically. However, the level of democracy, which has been emphasised in earlier aggregate level research, does not significantly affect the level of coordination. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Africa, elections, voting, parties, coordination, single-member district, volatility, institutionalisation
in
Commonwealth & Comparative Politics
volume
52
issue
2
pages
187 - 211
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:84898055380
ISSN
1743-9094
DOI
10.1080/14662043.2014.892724
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0cfea1f7-24ec-42ef-b297-9b386c1fa59e (old id 4378641)
date added to LUP
2014-04-01 09:34:43
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:11:37
@article{0cfea1f7-24ec-42ef-b297-9b386c1fa59e,
  abstract     = {Electoral coordination has been a primary concern for scholars of African politics, interested in topics such as ethnic conflict mitigation and democratisation, for decades. However, understanding of micro-level electoral coordination in Sub-Saharan Africa is generally still very limited. This study is the first to investigate voter coordination in Sub-Saharan Africa using constituency-level election results. Studying 20 single-member district elections during the period 1990–2010 in five Anglophone African countries (Botswana, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi and Zambia) demonstrates that many African elections continue to show low levels of electoral coordination. Using a multi-level regression analysis, the study shows that the most important explanation for low levels of coordination across Africa is high voter volatility. It is argued that insufficient information makes it hard for voters and candidates to act strategically. However, the level of democracy, which has been emphasised in earlier aggregate level research, does not significantly affect the level of coordination.},
  author       = {Wahman, Michael},
  issn         = {1743-9094},
  keyword      = {Africa,elections,voting,parties,coordination,single-member district,volatility,institutionalisation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {187--211},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Commonwealth & Comparative Politics},
  title        = {Electoral coordination in Anglophone Africa},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14662043.2014.892724},
  volume       = {52},
  year         = {2014},
}