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How insect flight steering muscles work.

Hedenström, Anders LU (2014) In PLoS Biology 12(3).
Abstract
Insights into how exactly a fly powers and controls flight have been hindered by the need to unpick the dynamic complexity of the muscles involved. The wingbeats of insects are driven by two antagonistic groups of power muscles and the force is funneled to the wing via a very complex hinge mechanism. The hinge consists of several hardened and articulated cuticle elements called sclerites. This articulation is controlled by a great number of small steering muscles, whose function has been studied by means of kinematics and muscle activity. The details and partly novel function of some of these steering muscles and their tendons have now been revealed in research published in this issue of PLOS Biology. The new study from Graham Taylor and... (More)
Insights into how exactly a fly powers and controls flight have been hindered by the need to unpick the dynamic complexity of the muscles involved. The wingbeats of insects are driven by two antagonistic groups of power muscles and the force is funneled to the wing via a very complex hinge mechanism. The hinge consists of several hardened and articulated cuticle elements called sclerites. This articulation is controlled by a great number of small steering muscles, whose function has been studied by means of kinematics and muscle activity. The details and partly novel function of some of these steering muscles and their tendons have now been revealed in research published in this issue of PLOS Biology. The new study from Graham Taylor and colleagues applies time-resolved X-ray microtomography to obtain a three-dimensional view of the blowfly wingbeat. Asymmetric power output is achieved by differential wingbeat amplitude on the left and right wing, which is mediated by muscular control of the hinge elements to mechanically block the wing stroke and by absorption of work by steering muscles on one of the sides. This new approach permits visualization of the motion of the thorax, wing muscles, and the hinge mechanism. This very promising line of work will help to reveal the complete picture of the flight motor of a fly. It also holds great potential for novel bio-inspired designs of fly-like micro air vehicles. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
PLoS Biology
volume
12
issue
3
publisher
Public Library of Science
external identifiers
  • pmid:24667632
  • wos:000333406800018
  • scopus:84899026680
ISSN
1544-9173
DOI
10.1371/journal.pbio.1001822
project
CAnMove
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
835f0a88-cfbf-47ad-b3b7-cc91f5a8f882 (old id 4379698)
date added to LUP
2014-04-24 12:45:30
date last changed
2017-07-30 04:08:53
@article{835f0a88-cfbf-47ad-b3b7-cc91f5a8f882,
  abstract     = {Insights into how exactly a fly powers and controls flight have been hindered by the need to unpick the dynamic complexity of the muscles involved. The wingbeats of insects are driven by two antagonistic groups of power muscles and the force is funneled to the wing via a very complex hinge mechanism. The hinge consists of several hardened and articulated cuticle elements called sclerites. This articulation is controlled by a great number of small steering muscles, whose function has been studied by means of kinematics and muscle activity. The details and partly novel function of some of these steering muscles and their tendons have now been revealed in research published in this issue of PLOS Biology. The new study from Graham Taylor and colleagues applies time-resolved X-ray microtomography to obtain a three-dimensional view of the blowfly wingbeat. Asymmetric power output is achieved by differential wingbeat amplitude on the left and right wing, which is mediated by muscular control of the hinge elements to mechanically block the wing stroke and by absorption of work by steering muscles on one of the sides. This new approach permits visualization of the motion of the thorax, wing muscles, and the hinge mechanism. This very promising line of work will help to reveal the complete picture of the flight motor of a fly. It also holds great potential for novel bio-inspired designs of fly-like micro air vehicles.},
  articleno    = {e1001822},
  author       = {Hedenström, Anders},
  issn         = {1544-9173},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  publisher    = {Public Library of Science},
  series       = {PLoS Biology},
  title        = {How insect flight steering muscles work.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.1001822},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {2014},
}