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Infant Body Composition and Adipokine Concentrations in Relation to Maternal Gestational Weight Gain.

Estampador, Angela LU ; Pomeroy, Jeremy; Renström, Frida LU ; Nelson, Scott M; Mogren, Ingrid; Persson, Margareta; Sattar, Naveed; Domellöf, Magnus and Franks, Paul LU (2014) In Diabetes Care 37(5). p.1432-1438
Abstract
OBJECTIVETo investigate associations of maternal gestational weight gain and body composition and their impact on offspring body composition and adipocytokine, glucose, and insulin concentrations at age 4 months.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODSThis was a prospective study including 31 mother-infant pairs (N = 62). Maternal body composition was assessed using doubly labeled water. Infant body composition was assessed at 4 months using air displacement plethysmography, and venous blood was assayed for glucose, insulin, adiponectin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and leptin concentrations.RESULTSRate of gestational weight gain in midpregnancy was significantly associated with infant fat mass (r = 0.41, P = 0.03); rate of gestational weight in late... (More)
OBJECTIVETo investigate associations of maternal gestational weight gain and body composition and their impact on offspring body composition and adipocytokine, glucose, and insulin concentrations at age 4 months.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODSThis was a prospective study including 31 mother-infant pairs (N = 62). Maternal body composition was assessed using doubly labeled water. Infant body composition was assessed at 4 months using air displacement plethysmography, and venous blood was assayed for glucose, insulin, adiponectin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and leptin concentrations.RESULTSRate of gestational weight gain in midpregnancy was significantly associated with infant fat mass (r = 0.41, P = 0.03); rate of gestational weight in late pregnancy was significantly associated with infant fat-free mass (r = 0.37, P = 0.04). Infant birth weight was also strongly correlated with infant fat-free mass at 4 months (r = 0.63, P = 0.0002). Maternal BMI and maternal fat mass were strongly inversely associated with infant IL-6 concentrations (r = -0.60, P = 0.002 and r = -0.52, P = 0.01, respectively). Infant fat-free mass was inversely related to infant adiponectin concentrations (r = -0.48, P = 0.008) and positively correlated with infant blood glucose adjusted for insulin concentrations (r = 0.42, P = 0.04). No significant associations for leptin were observed.CONCLUSIONSTiming of maternal weight gain differentially impacts body composition of the 4-month-old infant, which in turn appears to affect the infant's glucose and adipokine concentrations. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Diabetes Care
volume
37
issue
5
pages
1432 - 1438
publisher
American Diabetes Association
external identifiers
  • pmid:24623025
  • wos:000334840100060
  • scopus:84899104203
ISSN
1935-5548
DOI
10.2337/dc13-2265
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8307551a-f899-436b-9063-b84e4aa0f173 (old id 4383334)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24623025?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2014-04-03 13:49:13
date last changed
2017-04-09 03:26:34
@article{8307551a-f899-436b-9063-b84e4aa0f173,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVETo investigate associations of maternal gestational weight gain and body composition and their impact on offspring body composition and adipocytokine, glucose, and insulin concentrations at age 4 months.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODSThis was a prospective study including 31 mother-infant pairs (N = 62). Maternal body composition was assessed using doubly labeled water. Infant body composition was assessed at 4 months using air displacement plethysmography, and venous blood was assayed for glucose, insulin, adiponectin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and leptin concentrations.RESULTSRate of gestational weight gain in midpregnancy was significantly associated with infant fat mass (r = 0.41, P = 0.03); rate of gestational weight in late pregnancy was significantly associated with infant fat-free mass (r = 0.37, P = 0.04). Infant birth weight was also strongly correlated with infant fat-free mass at 4 months (r = 0.63, P = 0.0002). Maternal BMI and maternal fat mass were strongly inversely associated with infant IL-6 concentrations (r = -0.60, P = 0.002 and r = -0.52, P = 0.01, respectively). Infant fat-free mass was inversely related to infant adiponectin concentrations (r = -0.48, P = 0.008) and positively correlated with infant blood glucose adjusted for insulin concentrations (r = 0.42, P = 0.04). No significant associations for leptin were observed.CONCLUSIONSTiming of maternal weight gain differentially impacts body composition of the 4-month-old infant, which in turn appears to affect the infant's glucose and adipokine concentrations.},
  author       = {Estampador, Angela and Pomeroy, Jeremy and Renström, Frida and Nelson, Scott M and Mogren, Ingrid and Persson, Margareta and Sattar, Naveed and Domellöf, Magnus and Franks, Paul},
  issn         = {1935-5548},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {1432--1438},
  publisher    = {American Diabetes Association},
  series       = {Diabetes Care},
  title        = {Infant Body Composition and Adipokine Concentrations in Relation to Maternal Gestational Weight Gain.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/dc13-2265},
  volume       = {37},
  year         = {2014},
}