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Optical plasticity in fish lenses.

Kröger, Ronald LU (2013) In Progress in Retinal and Eye Research 34(Online 20 December 2012). p.78-88
Abstract
In a typical fish eye, the crystalline lens is the only refractive element. It is spherical in shape and has high refractive power. Most fish species have elaborate color vision and spectral sensitivity may range from the near-infrared to the near-ultraviolet. Longitudinal chromatic aberration exceeds depth of focus and chromatic blur is compensated for by species-specific multifocality of the lens. The complex optical properties of fish lenses are subject to accurate regulation, including circadian reversible adjustments and irreversible developmental tuning. The mechanisms optimize the transfer of visual information to the retina in diverse and variable environments, and allow for rapid evolutionary changes in color vision. Active... (More)
In a typical fish eye, the crystalline lens is the only refractive element. It is spherical in shape and has high refractive power. Most fish species have elaborate color vision and spectral sensitivity may range from the near-infrared to the near-ultraviolet. Longitudinal chromatic aberration exceeds depth of focus and chromatic blur is compensated for by species-specific multifocality of the lens. The complex optical properties of fish lenses are subject to accurate regulation, including circadian reversible adjustments and irreversible developmental tuning. The mechanisms optimize the transfer of visual information to the retina in diverse and variable environments, and allow for rapid evolutionary changes in color vision. Active optical tuning of the lens is achieved by changes in the refractive index gradient and involves layers of mature, denucleated lens fiber cells. First steps have been taken toward unraveling the signaling systems controlling lens optical plasticity. Multifocal lenses compensating for chromatic blur are common in all major groups of vertebrates, including birds and mammals. Furthermore, the optical quality of a monofocal lens, such as in the human eye, is equally sensitive to the exact shape of the refractive index profile. Optical plasticity in the crystalline lens may thus be present in vertebrates in general. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Crystalline lens, Color vision, Lens aberrations, Refractive index gradient, Lens fiber cell, Visual evolution
in
Progress in Retinal and Eye Research
volume
34
issue
Online 20 December 2012
pages
78 - 88
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000318744900004
  • pmid:23262260
  • scopus:84876738032
ISSN
1873-1635
DOI
10.1016/j.preteyeres.2012.12.001
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
440437b0-8446-4294-9c5d-cb8a63c16490 (old id 3346939)
date added to LUP
2013-01-09 13:10:40
date last changed
2019-07-09 01:39:10
@article{440437b0-8446-4294-9c5d-cb8a63c16490,
  abstract     = {In a typical fish eye, the crystalline lens is the only refractive element. It is spherical in shape and has high refractive power. Most fish species have elaborate color vision and spectral sensitivity may range from the near-infrared to the near-ultraviolet. Longitudinal chromatic aberration exceeds depth of focus and chromatic blur is compensated for by species-specific multifocality of the lens. The complex optical properties of fish lenses are subject to accurate regulation, including circadian reversible adjustments and irreversible developmental tuning. The mechanisms optimize the transfer of visual information to the retina in diverse and variable environments, and allow for rapid evolutionary changes in color vision. Active optical tuning of the lens is achieved by changes in the refractive index gradient and involves layers of mature, denucleated lens fiber cells. First steps have been taken toward unraveling the signaling systems controlling lens optical plasticity. Multifocal lenses compensating for chromatic blur are common in all major groups of vertebrates, including birds and mammals. Furthermore, the optical quality of a monofocal lens, such as in the human eye, is equally sensitive to the exact shape of the refractive index profile. Optical plasticity in the crystalline lens may thus be present in vertebrates in general.},
  author       = {Kröger, Ronald},
  issn         = {1873-1635},
  keyword      = {Crystalline lens,Color vision,Lens aberrations,Refractive index gradient,Lens fiber cell,Visual evolution},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {Online 20 December 2012},
  pages        = {78--88},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Progress in Retinal and Eye Research},
  title        = {Optical plasticity in fish lenses.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.preteyeres.2012.12.001},
  volume       = {34},
  year         = {2013},
}