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Psychosocial factors and attendance at a population-based mammography screening program in a cohort of Swedish women

Lagerlund, Magdalena LU ; Sontrop, Jessica M. and Zackrisson, Sophia LU (2014) In BMC Women's Health 14.
Abstract
Background: A better understanding of the factors that influence mammography screening attendance is needed to improve the effectiveness of these screening programs. The objective of the study was to examine whether psychosocial factors predicted attendance at a population-based invitational mammography screening program. Methods: Data on cohabitation, social network/support, sense of control, and stress were obtained from the Malmo Diet and Cancer Cohort Study and linked to the Malmo mammography register in Sweden. We analyzed 11,409 women (age 44 to 72) who were free of breast cancer at study entry (1992 to 1996). Mammography attendance was followed from cohort entry to December 31, 2009. Generalized Estimating Equations were used to... (More)
Background: A better understanding of the factors that influence mammography screening attendance is needed to improve the effectiveness of these screening programs. The objective of the study was to examine whether psychosocial factors predicted attendance at a population-based invitational mammography screening program. Methods: Data on cohabitation, social network/support, sense of control, and stress were obtained from the Malmo Diet and Cancer Cohort Study and linked to the Malmo mammography register in Sweden. We analyzed 11,409 women (age 44 to 72) who were free of breast cancer at study entry (1992 to 1996). Mammography attendance was followed from cohort entry to December 31, 2009. Generalized Estimating Equations were used to account for repeated measures within subjects. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) are reported. Results: Among 69,746 screening opportunities there were 5,552 (8%) cases of non-attendance. Higher odds of non-attendance were found among women who lived alone (OR=1.47 (1.33-1.63)) or with children only (OR=1.52 (1.29-1.81)), had one childbirth (OR=1.12 (1.01-1.24)) or three or more childbirths (OR=1.34 (1.21-1.48)), had low social participation (OR=1.21 (1.10-1.31)), low sense of control (OR=1.12 (1.02-1.23)), and experienced greater stress (OR=1.24 (1.13-1.36)). Conclusions: Public health campaigns designed to optimize mammography screening attendance may benefit from giving more consideration of how to engage with women who are less socially involved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Mammography, Breast cancer screening, Psychosocial factors, Social, support, Sense of control, Stress
in
BMC Women's Health
volume
14
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • wos:000333397500001
  • scopus:84896710790
ISSN
1472-6874
DOI
10.1186/1472-6874-14-33
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8f215bd7-6223-4e00-be13-97543cf278a5 (old id 4414092)
date added to LUP
2014-05-05 07:16:59
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:01:00
@article{8f215bd7-6223-4e00-be13-97543cf278a5,
  abstract     = {Background: A better understanding of the factors that influence mammography screening attendance is needed to improve the effectiveness of these screening programs. The objective of the study was to examine whether psychosocial factors predicted attendance at a population-based invitational mammography screening program. Methods: Data on cohabitation, social network/support, sense of control, and stress were obtained from the Malmo Diet and Cancer Cohort Study and linked to the Malmo mammography register in Sweden. We analyzed 11,409 women (age 44 to 72) who were free of breast cancer at study entry (1992 to 1996). Mammography attendance was followed from cohort entry to December 31, 2009. Generalized Estimating Equations were used to account for repeated measures within subjects. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) are reported. Results: Among 69,746 screening opportunities there were 5,552 (8%) cases of non-attendance. Higher odds of non-attendance were found among women who lived alone (OR=1.47 (1.33-1.63)) or with children only (OR=1.52 (1.29-1.81)), had one childbirth (OR=1.12 (1.01-1.24)) or three or more childbirths (OR=1.34 (1.21-1.48)), had low social participation (OR=1.21 (1.10-1.31)), low sense of control (OR=1.12 (1.02-1.23)), and experienced greater stress (OR=1.24 (1.13-1.36)). Conclusions: Public health campaigns designed to optimize mammography screening attendance may benefit from giving more consideration of how to engage with women who are less socially involved.},
  articleno    = {33},
  author       = {Lagerlund, Magdalena and Sontrop, Jessica M. and Zackrisson, Sophia},
  issn         = {1472-6874},
  keyword      = {Mammography,Breast cancer screening,Psychosocial factors,Social,support,Sense of control,Stress},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {BMC Women's Health},
  title        = {Psychosocial factors and attendance at a population-based mammography screening program in a cohort of Swedish women},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1472-6874-14-33},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2014},
}